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Dev Med Child Neurol. 2019 Nov 11. doi: 10.1111/dmcn.14390. [Epub ahead of print]

Seizure freedom improves health-related quality of life after epilepsy surgery in children.

Author information

1
Epilepsy Program, Division of Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2
Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, BLK Super Speciality Hospital, New Delhi, India.
3
Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Danat Al Emarat Hospital for Women and Children, Abu Dhabi, UAE.
4
Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
5
Department of Paediatrics, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.
6
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.
7
School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
8
Division of Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
9
Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
10
Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
11
Department of Pediatrics, London Health Sciences Center, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
12
Division of Neurology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
13
Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
14
Institute for Health Policy Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

AIM:

To determine whether epilepsy surgery improved health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and whether seizure freedom after surgery mediated the improvement in HRQoL.

METHOD:

This multicenter cohort study compared HRQoL after epilepsy surgery to pharmacological management in children with drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE). HRQoL was measured using the Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE) questionnaire at baseline and 1-year follow-up. The mediator between treatment type and HRQoL was seizure freedom.

RESULTS:

Two hundred and thirty-seven patients were recruited (surgery group: n=147 [92 males, 45 females]; pharmacological group: n=90 [53 males, 37 females]). Mean age at seizure onset was 6 years (SD 4y 4mo) in the surgical group and 6 years 1 month (SD 4y) in the pharmacological group. The odds ratio of seizure freedom was higher for the surgery versus pharmacological group (β=4.24 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 2.26-7.93], p<0.001). Surgery had no direct effect on total QOLCE score at 1-year (β=0.24 [95% CI -2.04 to 2.51], p=0.839) compared to pharmacological management, but had an indirect effect on total QOLCE that was mediated by seizure freedom (β=0.92 [95% CI 0.19-1.65], p=0.013), adjusting for baseline total QOLCE score. Surgery had a direct effect on improving social function (p=0.043), and an indirect effect on improving physical function (p=0.016), cognition (p=0.042), social function (p=0.012) and behavior (p=0.032), mediated by seizure freedom.

INTERPRETATION:

Greater seizure freedom achieved through epilepsy surgery mediated the improvement in HRQoL compared to pharmacological management in children with DRE.

WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS:

Seizure freedom is higher after pediatric epilepsy surgery compared to pharmacologically managed epilepsy. Surgery indirectly improves health-related quality of life (HRQoL) mediated by seizure freedom compared to pharmacological management. Surgery has a direct effect on improving social function relative to pharmacological management. Baseline HRQoL was an important predictor of HRQoL after treatment.

PMID:
31709524
DOI:
10.1111/dmcn.14390

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