Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ambio. 2019 Nov 9. doi: 10.1007/s13280-019-01282-y. [Epub ahead of print]

Factors regulating the coastal nutrient filter in the Baltic Sea.

Author information

1
Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000, Roskilde, Denmark.
2
Department of Geology, Lund University, Sölvegatan 12, 223 62, Lund, Sweden. daniel.conley@geol.lu.se.
3
SMHI, Sven Källfelts gata 15, 426 71, Västra Frölunda, Sweden.
4
Tvärminne Zoological Station, University of Helsinki, J.A. Palmenin tie 260, 10900, Hanko, Finland.
5
Environmental and Marine Biology, Åbo Akademi University, BioCity, 20500, Turku, Finland.
6
Finnish Environment Institute, Latokartanonkaari 11, 00790, Helsinki, Finland.
7
Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden.
8
Department of Experimental Ecology of Marine Organisms, Institute of Oceanography, University of Gdańsk, al. Marsz. J. Pilsudskiego 46, 81-378, Gdynia, Poland.
9
Department of Earth Sciences, Utrecht University, Princetonlaan 8A, 3584 CB, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
10
Department of Biological Oceanography, Leibniz Institute of Baltic Sea Research, Seestr. 15, 18119, Rostock, Germany.
11
Marine Research Institute, Universiteto al. 17, 92294, Klaipeda, Lithuania.

Abstract

The coastal zone of the Baltic Sea is diverse with strong regional differences in the physico-chemical setting. This diversity is also reflected in the importance of different biogeochemical processes altering nutrient and organic matter fluxes on the passage from land to sea. This review investigates the most important processes for removal of nutrients and organic matter, and the factors that regulate the efficiency of the coastal filter. Nitrogen removal through denitrification is high in lagoons receiving large inputs of nitrate and organic matter. Phosphorus burial is high in archipelagos with substantial sedimentation, but the stability of different burial forms varies across the Baltic Sea. Organic matter processes are tightly linked to the nitrogen and phosphorus cycles. Moreover, these processes are strongly modulated depending on composition of vegetation and fauna. Managing coastal ecosystems to improve the effectiveness of the coastal filter can reduce eutrophication in the open Baltic Sea.

KEYWORDS:

Biogeochemistry; Climate change; Coastal filter; Eutrophication; Hypoxia; Nutrient management

PMID:
31707582
DOI:
10.1007/s13280-019-01282-y

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center