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Sleep Med. 2019 Jul 24. pii: S1389-9457(19)30252-7. doi: 10.1016/j.sleep.2019.07.015. [Epub ahead of print]

Sleep and brain morphological changes in the eighth decade of life.

Author information

1
Brain Research Imaging Centre, Division of Neuroimaging Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Scottish Imaging Network, A Platform for Scientific Excellence (SINAPSE), UK; Department of Computer Science, Lagos State University, Lagos, Nigeria.
2
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Department of Sleep Medicine, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, NHS Lothian, UK.
3
Brain Research Imaging Centre, Division of Neuroimaging Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Scottish Imaging Network, A Platform for Scientific Excellence (SINAPSE), UK.
4
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
5
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Alzheimer Scotland Dementia Research Centre, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
6
Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
7
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Alzheimer Scotland Dementia Research Centre, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
8
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Alzheimer Scotland Dementia Research Centre, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
9
Brain Research Imaging Centre, Division of Neuroimaging Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Scottish Imaging Network, A Platform for Scientific Excellence (SINAPSE), UK; UK Dementia Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, UK. Electronic address: Joanna.wardlaw@ed.ac.uk.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Sleep is important for brain health. We analysed associations between usual sleep habits and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) markers of neurodegeneration (brain atrophy), vascular damage (white matter hyperintensities, WMH) and waste clearance (perivascular spaces, PVS) in older community-dwelling adults.

METHOD:

We collected self-reported usual sleep duration, quality and medical histories from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 (LBC1936) age 76 years and performed brain MRI. We calculated sleep efficiency, measured WMH and brain volumes, quantified PVS, and assessed associations between sleep measures and brain markers in multivariate models adjusted for demographic and medical history variables.

RESULTS:

In 457 subjects (53% males, mean age 76 ± 0.65 years), we found: brain and white matter loss with increased weekend daytime sleep (β = -0.114, P = 0.03; β = -0.122, P = 0.007 respectively), white matter loss with less efficient sleep (β = 0.132, P = 0.011) and PVS increased with interrupted sleep (OR 1.84 95% CI, P = 0.025).

CONCLUSION:

Cross-sectional associations of sleep parameters with brain atrophy and more PVS suggest adverse relationships between usual sleep habits and brain health in older people that should be evaluated longitudinally.

KEYWORDS:

Ageing; Brain atrophy; Cerebrovascular disease; Magnetic resonance imaging; Perivascular spaces; Sleep

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