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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2019 Oct 16;205:107621. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.107621. [Epub ahead of print]

Cannabis use disorder among people using cannabis daily/almost daily in the United States, 2002-2016.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 722 W 168th St, New York, NY, 10032, USA. Electronic address: js4222@columbia.edu.
2
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 722 W 168th St, New York, NY, 10032, USA. Electronic address: nsl2110@cumc.columbia.edu.
3
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 722 W 168th St, New York, NY, 10032, USA. Electronic address: les2196@cumc.columbia.edu.
4
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 722 W 168th St, New York, NY, 10032, USA. Electronic address: pm2838@cumc.columbia.edu.
5
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 722 W 168th St, New York, NY, 10032, USA. Electronic address: ssm2183@cumc.columbia.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cannabis use disorder (CUD) prevalence among people reporting past-year cannabis use declined from 2002-2016. We examined whether similar reductions in CUD were observed among people reporting daily/almost daily cannabis use. We expected that CUD prevalence among people reporting daily/almost daily use would not decrease.

METHODS:

We used 2002-2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) data, including 22,651 individuals using cannabis 300+ days in the past year. CUD was defined using DSM-IV criteria for cannabis abuse and/or dependence. Age categories included: 12-17, 18-25, and 26 + . Annual prevalence of CUD, cannabis dependence, cannabis abuse, and each individual abuse/dependence items accounted for the complex survey design. Differences in trends over time were examined by age group.

RESULTS:

From 2002-2016, the prevalence of CUD among people reporting daily/almost daily cannabis use decreased by 26.8% in adolescents, by 29.7% in ages 18-25, and by 37.5% in ages 26 + . Prevalence of DSM-IV cannabis dependence decreased significantly among adolescents (-43.9%) and young adults (-26.8%) but remained stable in adults 26 + . Reductions in most dependence items were observed in young adults, with less consistent patterns in adolescents and adults 26 + . Prevalence of DSM-IV cannabis abuse decreased overall and for each abuse item across all age groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Contrary to expectations, CUD prevalence decreased significantly across all ages reporting daily/almost daily cannabis use between 2002-2016. Cannabis dependence prevalence decreased for adolescents and young adults and was stable only among adults ages 26+ reporting daily/almost daily cannabis use. Potential drivers of this decrease should be further explored.

KEYWORDS:

Cannabis; Cannabis use disorder; Daily; Daily Cannabis use; Marijuana abuse; Marijuana use; Substance-related disorders

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