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Nat Nanotechnol. 2019 Nov;14(11):1007-1017. doi: 10.1038/s41565-019-0567-y. Epub 2019 Nov 6.

Smart cancer nanomedicine.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Chemical Biology, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
2
Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
3
Department of Clinical Chemistry and Haematology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
5
Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
6
Department of Biotechnology and Nanomedicine, SINTEF AS, Trondheim, Norway.
7
Cancer Clinic, St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
8
Institute for Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH Aachen University Clinic, Aachen, Germany.
9
Department of Oncological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
10
Institute for Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH Aachen University Clinic, Aachen, Germany. tlammers@ukaachen.de.
11
Department of Targeted Therapeutics, University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands. tlammers@ukaachen.de.
12
Department of Pharmaceutics, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. tlammers@ukaachen.de.

Abstract

Nanomedicines are extensively employed in cancer therapy. We here propose four strategic directions to improve nanomedicine translation and exploitation. (1) Patient stratification has become common practice in oncology drug development. Accordingly, probes and protocols for patient stratification are urgently needed in cancer nanomedicine, to identify individuals suitable for inclusion in clinical trials. (2) Rational drug selection is crucial for clinical and commercial success. Opportunistic choices based on drug availability should be replaced by investments in modular (pro)drug and nanocarrier design. (3) Combination therapies are the mainstay of clinical cancer care. Nanomedicines synergize with pharmacological and physical co-treatments, and should be increasingly integrated in multimodal combination therapy regimens. (4) Immunotherapy is revolutionizing the treatment of cancer. Nanomedicines can modulate the behaviour of myeloid and lymphoid cells, thereby empowering anticancer immunity and immunotherapy efficacy. Alone and especially together, these four directions will fuel and foster the development of successful cancer nanomedicine therapies.

PMID:
31695150
DOI:
10.1038/s41565-019-0567-y

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