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Vet Rec. 2019 Dec 21;185(24):759. doi: 10.1136/vr.105411. Epub 2019 Nov 5.

Hypervitaminosis D has no positive effects on goat tuberculosis and may cause chronic renal lesions.

Author information

1
Department of Comparative Pathology, University of Córdoba-Agrifood Campus of International Excellence (ceiA3), Cordoba, Spain.
2
Infectious Diseases Unit. Instituto Maimonides de Investigación Biomédica de Córdoba (IMIBIC). Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía de Córdoba - Universidad de Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain.
3
Centro de Vigilancia Sanitaria Veterinaria (VISAVET), Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain.
4
CZ Vaccines, Porriño, Pontevedra, Spain.
5
Dpto. de Sanidad Animal, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
6
Departamento de Medicina y Cirugía Animal, Universidad de Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain.
7
Laboratorios SYVA S.A.U. Technological Park, León, Spain.
8
MAEVA SERVET S.L, Alameda del Valle, Madrid, Spain.
9
Servicio de Inmunología Microbiana, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Investigación Carlos III, Majadahonda, Madrid.
10
SaBio (Health and Biotechnology), Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos IREC (CSIC-UCLM), Ciudad Real, Spain christian.gortazar@uclm.es.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is evidence for a link between vitamin D deficiency and active tuberculosis (TB). In human beings, several trials have evaluated the role of vitamin D supplementation in TB treatment with conflicting results. However, the role of vitamin D supplementation in animal TB control has received less attention. The authors evaluated the benefit of vitamin D supplementation for preventing mycobacterial infection or reducing TB lesions (TBL) in a controlled trial with goats naturally exposed to Mycobacterium caprae.

METHODS:

Two groups of goats, a vitamin D-supplemented group and a non-supplemented control group, were housed for 10 months in direct contact with M caprae-infected adult goats. Upon contact with the infected adult goats, all animals were TB-tested every two months.

RESULTS:

No experimental evidence of a protective effect of vitamin D supplementation based on M caprae culture prevalence, TBL prevalence, median TBL score or the proportion of single versus multiple organs presenting TBL was observed.

CONCLUSION:

The results indicate that, in the conditions used in this study, vitamin D supplementation in goats does not reduce TB infection risk nor the diffusion and severity of TBL. In addition, vitamin D-supplemented goats presented hyperphosphataemia and renal injury with calcifications suggestive of vitamin D intoxication.

KEYWORDS:

Capra hircus ; lesion scores; mycobacterium tuberculosis complex; renal pathology; tuberculosis lesion scores; vitamin D

PMID:
31690642
DOI:
10.1136/vr.105411

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interests: None declared.

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