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Pediatr Obes. 2019 Nov 5. doi: 10.1111/ijpo.12592. [Epub ahead of print]

Childhood hair cortisol concentration and early teen cardiometabolic outcomes.

[Article in German]

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
2
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.
3
Diabetes Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Maine Medical Center, Portland, Maine.
5
Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Portland, Maine.
6
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
7
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Erasmus Medical Center-Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
8
Department of Nutrition, Harvard, T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine associations of hair cortisol concentration (HCC) in mid-childhood and change in HCC from mid-childhood to early adolescence (ΔHCC) with early adolescent adiposity and cardiometabolic biomarker measures.

METHODS:

In Project Viva, a pre-birth cohort of mothers and children, we measured HCC in 599 white children in mid-childhood and in 426 of these participants in early adolescence. We used multivariable linear regression to examine associations of mid-childhood HCC and ΔHCC with BMI-for-age-and-sex z score, waist circumference, waist-height ratio, dual X-ray absorptiometry total and trunk fat mass, a metabolic risk z score, adiponectin, HOMA-IR, high-density lipoprotein, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, leptin, and systolic blood pressure.

RESULTS:

Over a mean (SD) follow-up of 5.2 (0.8) years, we did not find associations of mid-childhood HCC with BMI-for-age-and-sex z score (β = 0.00 per 1-interquartile range of HCC, 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.08 to 0.07), waist circumference (β = -0.04 cm, 95% CI, -0.83 to 0.74), metabolic risk z score (β = 0.04, 95% CI, -0.03 to 0.11), or other cardiometabolic measures except for an increase in log-transformed HOMA-IR (β = 0.10, 95% CI, 0.04-0.17). ΔHCC was not associated with any outcome measures.

CONCLUSIONS:

We found that mid-childhood HCC was not associated with early adolescent adiposity or cardiometabolic biomarkers except for a slight increase in HOMA-IR.

KEYWORDS:

adiposity; children; cohort studies; hair cortisol concentration; metabolic syndrome

PMID:
31689001
DOI:
10.1111/ijpo.12592

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