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Mayo Clin Proc. 2019 Nov;94(11):2230-2240. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2019.04.041.

Association of Fitness and Grip Strength With Heart Failure: Findings From the UK Biobank Population-Based Study.

Author information

1
Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, United Kingdom.
2
Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Carlos.Celis@glasgow.ac.uk.
3
Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, United Kingdom; Institute of Health and Wellbeing, United Kingdom.
4
Institute of Health and Wellbeing, United Kingdom.
5
Robertson Centre for Biostatistics, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the associations of objectively measured cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and grip strength (GS) with incident heart failure (HF), a clinical syndrome that results in substantial social and economic burden, using UK Biobank data.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Of the 502,628 participants recruited into the UK Biobank between April 1, 2007, and December 31, 2010, a total of 374,493 were included in our GS analysis and 57,053 were included in CRF analysis. Associations between CRF and GS and incident HF were investigated using Cox proportional hazard models, with adjustment for known measured confounders.

RESULTS:

During a mean of 4.1 (range, 2.4-7.1) years, 631 HF events occurred in those with GS data, and 66 HF events occurred in those with CRF data. Higher CRF was associated with 18% lower risk for HF (hazard ratio [HR], 0.82; 95% CI, 0.76-0.88) per 1-metabolic equivalent increment increase and GS was associated with 19% lower incidence of HF risk (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.77-0.86) per 5-kg increment increase. When CRF and GS were standardized, the HR for CRF was 0.50 per 1-SD increment (95% CI, 0.38-0.65), and for GS was 0.65 per 1-SD increment (95% CI, 0.58-0.72).

CONCLUSION:

Our data indicate that objective measurements of physical function (GS and CRF) are strongly and independently associated with lower HF incidence. Future studies targeting improving CRF and muscle strength should include HF as an outcome to assess whether these results are causal.

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