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Nutr Diet. 2019 Nov 3. doi: 10.1111/1747-0080.12591. [Epub ahead of print]

A tool for assessing the satisfaction of a diet: Development and preliminary validation of the Diet Satisfaction Score.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
2
Centre for Biostatistics, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
3
Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

AIM:

Adherence to dietary change is crucial for long-term benefit and a key element of adherence is the satisfaction of a given diet. We aimed to develop a brief questionnaire, suitable for use in clinical practice that can assess satisfaction with a diet, and to conduct preliminary evaluation of its reliability and validity.

METHODS:

The questionnaire was developed and drafts were sent to two expert panels for content review. The final questionnaire was assessed for internal consistency, face and construct validity, and test-retest reliability. Expert feedback was provided by nine clinicians/researchers. The tool was assessed in three phases in different international populations who were recruited using social media. It included adults who were currently following a diet (total n = 1604), and those who had recently abandoned their diet (phase 3 only).

RESULTS:

The Diet Satisfaction Score consisted of 10 items measuring one dimension (Cronbach's alpha = 0.85), and participants had a mean total Diet Satisfaction Score of 3.7 (SD = 0.50) from a possible range of 1 to 5. Test-retest reliability was good as indicated by an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.64 and a mean difference (95% confidence interval, CI) between repeated test scores of 0.03 (-0.02, 0.09). Each 1-point increase in Diet Satisfaction Score was associated with longer diet duration by 1.7 weeks (95% CI = 1.5, 2.0, P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The Diet Satisfaction Score showed good reliability and preliminary validity and may be a useful clinical tool for assessing diet satisfaction and has the potential to predict adherence.

KEYWORDS:

adherence; diet; psychometrics; satisfaction; surveys and questionnaires; weight management

PMID:
31680438
DOI:
10.1111/1747-0080.12591

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