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Appetite. 2020 Mar 1;146:104506. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2019.104506. Epub 2019 Oct 31.

Effect of exercise-meal timing on energy intake, appetite and food reward in adolescents with obesity: The TIMEX study.

Author information

1
Clermont Auvergne University, EA 3533, Laboratory of the Metabolic Adaptations to Exercise Under Physiological and Pathological Conditions (AME2P), Clermont-Ferrand, France; INRA, UMR, 1019, Clermont-Ferrand, France; UGECAM Nutrition Obesity Ambulatory Hostipal, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Electronic address: fillonalicia@gmail.com.
2
Department of Kinesiology, University of Montreal, 2100 Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, H3C 3J7, Canada; Sainte-Justine UHC Research Center, 5757 Decelles, Montreal, H3T 1C5, Canada. Electronic address: me.mathieu@umontreal.ca.
3
UGECAM Nutrition Obesity Ambulatory Hostipal, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Electronic address: julie.masurier@ugecam.assurance-maladie.fr.
4
Clermont Auvergne University, EA 3533, Laboratory of the Metabolic Adaptations to Exercise Under Physiological and Pathological Conditions (AME2P), Clermont-Ferrand, France. Electronic address: johanna.roche@uca.fr.
5
Clermont Auvergne University, EA 3533, Laboratory of the Metabolic Adaptations to Exercise Under Physiological and Pathological Conditions (AME2P), Clermont-Ferrand, France. Electronic address: maud.miguet@gmail.com.
6
Clermont Auvergne University, EA 3533, Laboratory of the Metabolic Adaptations to Exercise Under Physiological and Pathological Conditions (AME2P), Clermont-Ferrand, France. Electronic address: khammassimarwa.issep@hotmail.com.
7
School of Psychology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK. Electronic address: G.S.Finlayson@leeds.ac.uk.
8
School of Psychology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK. Electronic address: K.Beaulieu@leeds.ac.uk.
9
Clermont-Ferrand University Hospital, Biostatistics Unit (DRCI), Clermont-Ferrand, France. Electronic address: bpereira@chu-clermontferrand.fr.
10
INRA, UMR, 1019, Clermont-Ferrand, France; Department of Sport Medicine and Functional Explorations, Clermont-Ferrand University Hospital, G. Montpied Hospital, Clermont-Ferrand, France; University Clermont Auvergne, UFR Medicine, Clermont-Ferrand, France; CRNH-Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Electronic address: mduclos@chu-clermontferrand.fr.
11
INRA, UMR, 1019, Clermont-Ferrand, France; University Clermont Auvergne, UFR Medicine, Clermont-Ferrand, France; CRNH-Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France; Department of Human Nutrition, Clermont-Ferrand University Hospital, G. Montpied Hospital, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Electronic address: yves.boirie@inra.fr.
12
Clermont Auvergne University, EA 3533, Laboratory of the Metabolic Adaptations to Exercise Under Physiological and Pathological Conditions (AME2P), Clermont-Ferrand, France; CRNH-Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Electronic address: thiveldavid@hotmail.com.

Abstract

The present study manipulated the delay between exercise and test meal to investigate its effect on energy intake, appetite sensations and food reward in adolescents with obesity. Fifteen adolescents with obesity randomly completed 3 experimental sessions: i) rest without exercise (CON); ii) 30 min of exercise 180 min before lunch (EX-180); iii) 30 min of exercise 60 min before lunch (EX-60). Ad libitum energy intake was assessed at lunch and dinner, and food reward (LFPQ) assessed before and after lunch. Appetite sensations were assessed at regular intervals. Absolute energy intake was not different between conditions despite a 14.4% lower intake in EX-60 relative to CON. Lunch relative energy intake (REI: energy intake - exercise-induced energy expenditure) was higher in CON compared with EX-60 (p < 0.001). Lunch fat intake was lower in EX-60 compared with CON (p = 0.01) and EX-180(p = 0.02). Pre-lunch hunger in CON was lower than EX-180 (p = 0.02). Pre-lunch prospective food consumption and desire to eat were lower in CON compared with both exercise conditions (p = 0.001). A significant condition effect was found for explicit liking for high-fat relative to low-fat foods before lunch (p = 0.03) with EX-60 being significantly lower than EX-180 (p = 0.001). The nutritional and food reward adaptations to exercise might be dependent on the timing of exercise, which is of importance to optimize its effect on energy balance in adolescents with obesity. CLINICAL TRIAL REFERENCE: NCT03807609.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; Appetite; Energy intake; Exercise timing; Food reward; Obesity

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