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Otolaryngol Clin North Am. 2020 Feb;53(1):115-126. doi: 10.1016/j.otc.2019.09.006. Epub 2019 Oct 31.

Vestibular Implantation and the Feasibility of Fluoroscopy-Guided Electrode Insertion.

Author information

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, P.O. box 5800, 6202 AZ, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, P.O. box 5800, 6202 AZ, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
3
Division of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Geneva University Hospitals, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1205, Geneva, Switzerland.
4
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, P.O. box 5800, 6202 AZ, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: raymond.vande.berg@mumc.nl.

Abstract

Recent research has shown promising results for the development of a clinically feasible vestibular implant in the near future. However, correct electrode placement remains a challenge. It was shown that fluoroscopy was able to visualize the semicircular canal ampullae and electrodes, and guide electrode insertion in real time. Ninety-four percent of the 18 electrodes were implanted correctly (<1.5 mm distance to target). The median distances were 0.60 mm, 0.85 mm, and 0.65 mm for the superior, lateral, and posterior semicircular canal, respectively. These findings suggest that fluoroscopy can significantly improve electrode placement during vestibular implantation.

KEYWORDS:

Bilateral vestibulopathy; Feasibility study; Fluoroscopy; Implanted; Implanted Electrodes; Proof of concept study; Radiography; Semicircular canals; Vestibular implant

PMID:
31677739
DOI:
10.1016/j.otc.2019.09.006
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