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Mol Cell Proteomics. 2019 Nov 1. pii: mcp.RA119.001594. doi: 10.1074/mcp.RA119.001594. [Epub ahead of print]

Proteomics profiling of autologous blood and semen exosomes from HIV-infected and uninfected individuals reveals compositional and functional variabilities.

Author information

1
Stony Brook University, United States.
2
University of Iowa, United States.
3
Meharry Med College, United States.
4
University of Arizona, United States.
5
UNT Health Science Center, United States.
6
Center for AIDS Health Disparities Research,, Meharry Medical College, United States.
7
University of Iowa.
8
Meharry Medical College, United States.
9
Center for AIDS Health Disparities Research, Meharry Medical College, United States.
10
Pharmacology, Stony Brook University, United States chioma.okeoma@stonybrook.edu.

Abstract

Blood and semen are important body-fluids that carry exosomes for bioinformation transmission. Therefore, characterization of their proteomes is necessary for understanding body-fluid-specific physiologic and pathophysiologic functions. Using systematic multifactorial proteomic profiling, we characterized the proteomes of exosomes and exosome-free fractions from autologous blood and semen from three HIV-uninfected and three HIV-infected participants (total of 24 samples). We identified exosome-based protein signatures specific to blood and semen along with HIV-induced tissue-dependent proteomic perturbations. We validated our findings with samples from 16 additional donors and showed that unlike blood exosomes (BE), semen exosomes (SE) are enriched in clusterin. SE but not BE promote Protein•Nucleic acid binding and increase cell adhesion irrespective of HIV infection. This is the first comparative study of the proteome of autologous BE and SE. The proteins identified may be developed as biomarkers applicable to different fields of medicine, including reproduction and infectious diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Blood*; Exosomes; HIV; Infectious disease; Semen; Viruses

PMID:
31676584
DOI:
10.1074/mcp.RA119.001594
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