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Trop Med Int Health. 2019 Nov 1. doi: 10.1111/tmi.13326. [Epub ahead of print]

Can a family medicine rotation improve medical students' knowledge, skills and attitude towards primary care in Vietnam? A pre-test-post-test comparison and qualitative survey.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Can Tho University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Can Tho, Vietnam.
2
Faculty of Public Health, Can Tho University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Can Tho, Vietnam.
3
Faculty of Medicine, Can Tho University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Can Tho, Vietnam.
4
Skills Training Unit, Can Tho University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Can Tho, Vietnam.
5
Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Well-designed studies on the impact of a family medicine rotation on medical students are rare, and very few studies include a qualitative component. This study aimed to determine the improvement of medical students' knowledge, communication skills and attitude towards primary care and explore their perceptions after rotations, in comparison with a control group.

METHODS:

We used a mixed-methods design, comprising a pre-test-post-test comparison between a sample of trained students who took family medicine rotations and a control group and a qualitative survey. The measurement of improvement included (i) multiple choice question testing, (ii) objective structured checklist examinations, (iii) self-reporting and (iv) interviews and focus group discussions. Data were collected from August 2017 to June 2018.

RESULTS:

There were 696 students in the trained group and 617 controls. The two groups' baseline scores in knowledge, communication skills and attitude were not significantly different. Knowledge covering five domains of family medicine (Pearson's r from 0.6 to 0.9) improved significantly, as did attitudes towards primary care in the trained group. There were no differences in communication and counselling skills between the two groups for four situations, but for two-health check-ups and mental health care-skills were significantly improved (Pearson's r from 0.28 to 0.43). The qualitative survey showed highly positive feedback from trained students.

CONCLUSIONS:

The family medicine rotation significantly improved students' knowledge and attitude towards primary care and some communication skills. Further studies should investigate students' interest in and career choice for this discipline.

KEYWORDS:

Vietnam; attitude; family medicine rotation; knowledge; pre-test and post-test comparison; primary care; qualitative survey; skill

PMID:
31674702
DOI:
10.1111/tmi.13326

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