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J AAPOS. 2019 Dec;23(6):332.e1-332.e6. doi: 10.1016/j.jaapos.2019.08.279. Epub 2019 Oct 26.

Treatment of non-type 1 retinopathy of prematurity in the Postnatal Growth and Retinopathy of Prematurity (G-ROP) study.

Author information

1
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
2
Scheie Eye Institute, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
3
Abrahamson Pediatric Eye Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio.
4
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Scheie Eye Institute, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: binenbaum@email.chop.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine the prevalence and characteristics of eyes treated for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) not meeting currently recommended early treatment (type 1) criteria.

METHODS:

This was a secondary analysis of data from the Postnatal Growth and ROP (G-ROP) study, a retrospective cohort study of 7,483 infants undergoing ROP examinations and treatment at 29 North American hospitals between January 2006 and June 2012. Medical records were reviewed to determine the prevalence and characteristics of eyes treated for ROP less severe than type 1 ROP.

RESULTS:

Of 1,004 eyes that received ROP treatment, 126 eyes of 91 infants (0.8% of all eyes; 12.5% of treated eyes) underwent treatment for ROP less severe than type 1. Mean age at treatment was 38 weeks' post-menstrual age (range, 32-49 weeks). Reasons for treatment included type 1 ROP in the fellow eye (43%), stage 3 ROP with pre-plus in the treated eye (30%), concerning structural changes in the retina (7%), persistent stage 3 ROP for ≥6 weeks without regression (6%), stage 3 ROP with no plus disease in the treated eye (5%), stage 3, zone III ROP with plus disease (3%), logistical considerations (3%), or stage 2 disease in the treated eye (2%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Of all eyes treated for ROP, 1/8 were treated for disease less severe than currently recommended type 1 criteria. Clinician judgment of risk for permanent vision impairment superseded recommended treatment criteria and was usually related to type 1 disease in the fellow eye or pre-plus vascular changes in one or both eyes.

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