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Sci Rep. 2019 Oct 30;9(1):15608. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-52128-2.

Roles of monocarboxylate transporter subtypes in promotion and suppression of osteoclast differentiation and survival on bone.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry, Showa University School of Dentistry, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Department of Periodontology, Showa University School of Dentistry, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Department of Biochemistry, Showa University School of Dentistry, Tokyo, Japan. kyoshimura@dent.showa-u.ac.jp.
4
Department of Pharmacology, Showa University School of Dentistry, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) provide transmembrane transport of monocarboxylates such as lactate and pyruvate. The present results showed that α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHC), an inhibitor of MCTs, promoted osteoclast differentiation from macrophages at lower concentrations (0.1-0.3 mM) and suppressed that at a higher concentration (1.0 mM). On the other hand, CHC reduced the number of mature osteoclasts on the surface of dentin in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, macrophages and osteoclasts were found to express the Mct1, Mct2, and Mct4 genes, with Mct1 and Mct4 expression higher in macrophages, and that of Mct2 higher in osteoclasts. Although Mct1 gene knockdown in macrophages enhanced osteoclast formation induced by RANKL, Mct2 gene knockdown suppressed that. Finally, Mct2 gene silencing in mature osteoclasts decreased their number and, thereby, bone resorption. These results suggest that MCT1 is a negative regulator and MCT2 a positive regulator of osteoclast differentiation, while MCT2 is required for bone resorption by osteoclasts.

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