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J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2019 Oct 28;16(1):47. doi: 10.1186/s12970-019-0316-5.

The effects of a caffeine-like supplement, TeaCrine®, on muscular strength, endurance and power performance in resistance-trained men.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition, Food & Exercise Sciences, Institute of Sports Sciences & Medicine, Florida State University, 1104 Spirit Way, Tallahassee, FL, 32306, USA.
2
The Center for Applied Health Sciences, Canfield, OH, 44515, USA.
3
Deparment of Occupational Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA.
4
Korey Stringer Institute, Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 60268, USA.
5
Department of Nutrition, Food & Exercise Sciences, Institute of Sports Sciences & Medicine, Florida State University, 1104 Spirit Way, Tallahassee, FL, 32306, USA. mormsbee@fsu.edu.
6
Discipline of Biokinetics, Exercise and Leisure Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa. mormsbee@fsu.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

TeaCrine® is the synthetic version to naturally occurring theacrine (1, 3, 7, 9-tetramethyluric acid) found in the leaves of Camellia kucha tea plants. A few studies have examined the effects of TeaCrine® on cognitive perception, but no research exists examining its effects on resistance exercise performance. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of TeaCrine®, a caffeine-like compound, on maximal muscular strength, endurance, and power performance in resistance-trained men.

METHODS:

Twelve resistance-trained men participated in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over designed study. Each participant performed one-repetition maximum (1RM) bench press, 1RM squat, bench press repetitions to failure (RTF) at 70% 1RM, squat RTF at 70% 1RM, and 2-km rowing time trial 90 min after consumption of: (1) Caffeine 300 mg (CAFF300); (2) TeaCrine® 300 mg (TEA300); (3) TeaCrine® + Caffeine (COMBO; 150 mg/150 mg); (4) Placebo 300 mg (PLA). Power and velocity were measured using a TENDO Power Analyzer. Visual analogue scales for energy, focus, motivation to exercise, and fatigue were administered at baseline and 90 min post-treatment ingestion (pre-workout). Rating of perceived exertion was assessed after bench press RTF and squat RTF.

RESULTS:

There were no differences between groups for 1RM, RTF, and power in the bench press and squat exercises. Only CAFF300 resulted in significant increases in perceived energy and motivation to exercise vs. TEA300 and PLA (Energy: + 9.8%, 95% confidence interval [3.3-16.4%], p < 0.01; + 15.3%, 95% CI [2.2-28.5%], p < 0.02; Motivation to exercise: + 8.9%, 95% CI [0.2-17.6%], p = 0.04, + 14.8%, 95% CI [4.7-24.8%], p < 0.01, respectively) and increased focus (+ 9.6%, 95% CI [2.1-17.1%], p = 0.01) vs. TEA300, but there were no significant differences between CAFF300 and COMBO (Energy + 3.9% [- 6.9-14.7%], Focus + 2.5% [- 6.3-11.3%], Motivation to exercise + 0.5% [- 11.6-12.6%]; p > 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Neither TEA300, CAFF300, COMBO, or PLA (when consumed 90 min pre-exercise) improved muscular strength, power, or endurance performance in resistance-trained men. Only CAFF300 improved measures of focus, energy, and motivation to exercise.

KEYWORDS:

Bench press; Caffeine; Endurance; Ergogenic; Power; Squat; Strength; Supplements; TeaCrine®

PMID:
31660991
PMCID:
PMC6816173
DOI:
10.1186/s12970-019-0316-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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