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Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2019 Nov;33(6):490-502. doi: 10.1111/ppe.12592. Epub 2019 Oct 28.

The Preconception Period analysis of Risks and Exposures Influencing health and Development (PrePARED) consortium.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA.
2
School of Public Health, University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia.
3
Epidemiology Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.
4
Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Durham, NC, USA.
5
Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
7
Department of Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety (Ministry of Education), Global Health Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai Shi, China.
8
Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
9
Division of Public Health, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
10
OMNI Research Group, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Ottawa, Faculty of Medicine, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
11
Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
12
The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
13
Department of Kinesiology, College of Health and Human Development, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.
14
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.
15
Diabetes Unit, King Edward Memorial Hospital & Research Centre, Pune, India.
16
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics, Iowa City, IA, USA.
17
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
18
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
19
Department of Pediatrics, Heart Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
20
Department of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
21
Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
22
Ministry of Education and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children's Environmental Health, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
23
Duke University Hospital, Durham, NC, USA.
24
Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Preconception health may have intergenerational influences. We have formed the PrePARED (Preconception Period Analysis of Risks and Exposures influencing health and Development) research consortium to address methodological, conceptual, and generalisability gaps in the literature.

OBJECTIVES:

The consortium will investigate the effects of preconception exposures on four sets of outcomes: (1) fertility and miscarriage; (2) pregnancy-related conditions; (3) perinatal and child health; and (4) adult health outcomes.

POPULATION:

A study is eligible if it has data measured for at least one preconception time point, has a minimum of selected core data, and is open to collaboration and data harmonisation.

DESIGN:

The included studies are a mix of studies following women or couples intending to conceive, general-health cohorts that cover the reproductive years, and pregnancy/child cohort studies that have been linked with preconception data. The majority of the participating studies are prospective cohorts, but a few are clinical trials or record linkages.

METHODS:

Data analysis will begin with harmonisation of data collected across cohorts. Initial areas of interest include nutrition and obesity; tobacco, marijuana, and other substance use; and cardiovascular risk factors.

PRELIMINARY RESULTS:

Twenty-three cohorts with data on almost 200 000 women have combined to form this consortium, begun in 2018. Twelve studies are of women or couples actively planning pregnancy, and six are general-population cohorts that cover the reproductive years; the remainder have some other design. The primary focus for four was cardiovascular health, eight was fertility, one was environmental exposures, three was child health, and the remainder general women's health. Among other cohorts assessed for inclusion, the most common reason for ineligibility was lack of prospectively collected preconception data.

CONCLUSIONS:

The consortium will serve as a resource for research in many subject areas related to preconception health, with implications for science, practice, and policy.

KEYWORDS:

birthweight; cohort studies; common data elements; fertility; preconception care; pregnancy; research design

PMID:
31659792
DOI:
10.1111/ppe.12592

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