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Nat Neurosci. 2019 Oct 28. doi: 10.1038/s41593-019-0525-x. [Epub ahead of print]

Stem-cell-derived human microglia transplanted in mouse brain to study human disease.

Author information

1
Centre for Brain and Disease Research, Flanders Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Leuven, Belgium. renzo.mancuso@kuleuven.vib.be.
2
Department of Neurosciences and Leuven Brain Institute, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. renzo.mancuso@kuleuven.vib.be.
3
Department of Neurosciences and Leuven Brain Institute, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
4
Department of Development and Regeneration, Stem Cell Biology and Embryology, KU Leuven Stem Cell Institute, Leuven, Belgium.
5
Centre for Brain and Disease Research, Flanders Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Leuven, Belgium.
6
Department of Neurosciences, Research Group Experimental Neurosurgery and Neuroanatomy, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
7
UK Dementia Research Institute at UCL, University College London, London, UK.
8
Centre for Brain and Disease Research, Flanders Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Leuven, Belgium. bart.destrooper@kuleuven.vib.be.
9
Department of Neurosciences and Leuven Brain Institute, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. bart.destrooper@kuleuven.vib.be.
10
UK Dementia Research Institute at UCL, University College London, London, UK. bart.destrooper@kuleuven.vib.be.

Abstract

Although genetics highlights the role of microglia in Alzheimer's disease, one-third of putative Alzheimer's disease risk genes lack adequate mouse orthologs. Here we successfully engraft human microglia derived from embryonic stem cells in the mouse brain. The cells recapitulate transcriptionally human primary microglia ex vivo and show expression of human-specific Alzheimer's disease risk genes. Oligomeric amyloid-β induces a divergent response in human versus mouse microglia. This model can be used to study the role of microglia in neurological diseases.

PMID:
31659342
DOI:
10.1038/s41593-019-0525-x

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