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Eur J Hum Genet. 2019 Oct 29. doi: 10.1038/s41431-019-0530-2. [Epub ahead of print]

Genetic correlations between pain phenotypes and depression and neuroticism.

Author information

1
Division of Population Health and Genomics, School of Medicine, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD2 4BF, UK. w.meng@dundee.ac.uk.
2
Division of Psychiatry, Edinburgh Medical School, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH10 5HF, UK.
3
Division of Population Health and Genomics, School of Medicine, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD2 4BF, UK.
4
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH8 9JZ, UK.

Abstract

Correlations between pain phenotypes and psychiatric traits such as depression and the personality trait of neuroticism are not fully understood. In this study, we estimated the genetic correlations of eight pain phenotypes (defined by the UK Biobank, n = 151,922-226,683) with depressive symptoms, major depressive disorders and neuroticism using the the cross-trait linkage disequilibrium score regression (LDSC) method integrated in the LD Hub. We also used the LDSC software to calculate the genetic correlations among pain phenotypes. All pain phenotypes, except hip pain and knee pain, had significant and positive genetic correlations with depressive symptoms, major depressive disorders and neuroticism. All pain phenotypes were heritable, with pain all over the body showing the highest heritability (h2 = 0.31, standard error = 0.072). Many pain phenotypes had positive and significant genetic correlations with each other indicating shared genetic mechanisms. Our results suggest that pain, neuroticism and depression share partially overlapping genetic risk factors.

PMID:
31659249
DOI:
10.1038/s41431-019-0530-2

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