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Expert Rev Hematol. 2020 Jan;13(1):5-11. doi: 10.1080/17474086.2020.1685867. Epub 2019 Oct 30.

Curcumin: hopeful treatment of hemophilic arthropathy via inhibition of inflammation and angiogenesis.

Author information

1
Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran.
2
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, La Paz University Hospital-IdiPaz, Madrid, Spain.
3
Department of Biochemistry, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran.

Abstract

Introduction: Hemophilic arthropathy (HA) is a serious complication among hemophilic patients causing a wide range of morbidity due to the inflammatory reactions followed by repeated episodes of bleeding. This condition has recently been shown to be accompanied by angiogenesis. The cascade starts with iron accumulation leading to an increase in CD68+ and CD11b+ cells responsible for initiating the inflammation.Areas covered: During inflammation, different factors and cytokines such as interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) actively play parts in the pathogenesis of HA and also angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that different pro-angiogenic and angiogenic factors such as hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), oxidative stress and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are also important in the pathogenesis of HA. Curcumin is known for its strong anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic potentials. This agent is able to inhibit the mentioned inflammatory and angiogenic factors such as IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, VEGF, MMPs, and HIF-1α. Also, as well as anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory activity, curcumin has a strong antioxidant potential and can decrease oxidative stress.Expert opinion: It seems that curcumin could be considered as a possible agent for the treatment of HA through inhibition of inflammation, oxidative stress, and angiogenesis.

KEYWORDS:

Hemophilic arthropathy; angiogenesis; curcumin; cytokine; inflammation; oxidative stress

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