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J Epidemiol. 2019 Oct 26. doi: 10.2188/jea.JE20190141. [Epub ahead of print]

Associations of sedentary and physically-active behaviors with cognitive-function decline in community-dwelling older adults: compositional data analysis from the NEIGE study.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Tokyo Medical University.
2
Institute of Gerontology, The University of Tokyo.
3
Department of Global Health Promotion, Tokyo Medical and Dental University.
4
School of Health and life Science, Institute of Applied Health Research, Glasgow Caledonian University.
5
Department of Sport and Movement Science, Ghent University.
6
Behavioral Epidemiology Laboratory, Baker Heart & Diabetes Institute.
7
Centre for Urban Transitions, Swinburne University of Technology.
8
Division of Public Health, Department of Infectious Control and International Medicine, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Physical activity can help to protect against cognitive decline in older adults. However, little is known about the potential combined relationships of time spent in sedentary behavior (SB), light-intensity physical activity (LPA), and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with indices of cognitive health. We examined the cross-sectional associations of objectively-determined sedentary and physically-active behaviors with an indicator of cognitive function decline (CFD) in older adults.

METHODS:

A randomly-recruited sample of 511 Japanese older adults (47% male; aged 65-84 years) wore a tri-axial accelerometer (HJA-750C, Omron) for seven consecutive days in 2017. Cognitive function was assessed by interviewers using the Japanese version of Mini-Mental State Examination, with a score of ≤23 indicating CFD. Associations of sedentary and physically-active behaviors with CFD were examined using a compositional logistic regression analysis based on isometric log-ratio transformations of time use, adjusting for potential confounders.

RESULTS:

Forty one (9.4%) of the participants had an indication of CFD. Activity compositions differed significantly between CFD and normal cognitive function (NCF); the proportion of time spent in MVPA was 39.1% lower, relatively to the overall mean composition in those with CFD, and was 5.3% higher in those with NCF. There was a significant beneficial association of having a higher proportion of MVPA relative to other activities with CFD. LPA and SB were not associated with CFD when models were corrected for time spent in all activity behaviors.

CONCLUSIONS:

Larger relative contribution of MVPA was favorably associated with an indicator of CFD in older adults.

KEYWORDS:

accelerometry; aging; exercise; neurocognitive disorders; sedentary lifestyle

PMID:
31656243
DOI:
10.2188/jea.JE20190141
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