Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Food Chem. 2020 Mar 5;308:125555. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2019.125555. Epub 2019 Oct 10.

Use of a flor yeast strain for the second fermentation of sparkling wines: Effect of endogenous CO2 over-pressure on the volatilome.

Author information

1
Department of Agricultural Chemistry, Marie Curie (C3) Building, Agrifood Campus of International Excellence CeiA3, University of Córdoba, Ctra. N-IV-A, km 396, 14014 Cordoba, Spain.
2
Department of Microbiology, Severo Ochoa (C6) Building, Agrifood Campus of International Excellence CeiA3, University of Cordoba, Ctra. N-IV-A, kmm 396, 14014 Cordoba, Spain.
3
Department of Agricultural Chemistry, Marie Curie (C3) Building, Agrifood Campus of International Excellence CeiA3, University of Córdoba, Ctra. N-IV-A, km 396, 14014 Cordoba, Spain. Electronic address: qe1movij@uco.es.
4
Institut de Recerca i Tecnologia Agroalimentaries - Institut Català de la Vinya i el Vi), Plaça Àgora, 2, 08720 Vilafranca del Penedès, Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeast is used for the first time in sparkling wine-making. Twenty-six oenological variables and fifty-three volatile metabolites are quantified in the middle (P = 3 bar) and at the end (P = 6 bar) of the second fermentation, carried out in open and closed bottles. A heat-map of volatiles and the fingerprints obtained for ten chemical families and ten odorant series visualize the changes for each condition. Terpenes, fatty acids and volatile phenols increased their contents by pressure effect at the end of the study by 25.0, 7.8 and 2.2%, respectively. The remaining families decrease between 17.4% and 30.1% for furanic compounds and esters in the same stage. A Principal Component Analysis established that nine volatiles are mainly affected by pressure and five by fermentation stage. The use of ethanol-tolerant flor yeasts constitutes an innovative procedure for the enhancement of the sparkling wines diversification.

KEYWORDS:

1,3-Dimethoxy-2-hydroxybenzene (PubChem CID:7041); 2,3-Butanediol (PubChem CID:262); 2-Ethylhexan-1-ol (PubChem CID: 7720); 2-Methyl-1-Butanol (PubChem CID: 8723); 2-Methyl-propan-1-ol (PubChem CID:6560); 2-Phenylethan-1-ol (PubChem CID: 7409); 2-Phenylethyl acetate (PubChem CID: 7654); 3-Methyl-1-Butanol (PubChem CID:31260); 4-Ethenyl-2-methoxyphenol (PubChem CID:332); 5-H-furan-2-one (PubChem CID:10341); Acetaldehyde (PubChem CID:177); Acetoin (PubChem CID:173); Benzaldehyde (PubChem CID: 240); Chemometry; Decanal (PubChem CID: 8175); Decanoic acid (PubChem CID: 2969); Dihydrofuran-2(3H)-one (PubChem: 7302); Dodecanoic acid (PubChem CID: 3893); Ethyl acetate (PubChem CID: 8857); Ethyl butanoate (PubChem CID:7762); Ethyl decanoate (PubChem CID: 8048); Ethyl dodecanoate (PubChem CID:7800); Ethyl hexadecanoate (PubChem CID: 12366); Ethyl hexanoate (PubChem CID: 31265); Ethyl isobutanoate (PubChem CID:7342); Ethyl lactate (PubChem CID: 7344); Ethyl octanoate (PubChem: CID: 7799); Ethyl propanoate (PubChem CID: 7749); Ethyl tetradecanoate (PubChem CID:31283); Flor yeast; Guaiacol (PubChem CID: 460); Hexan-1-ol (PubChem CID: 8103); Hexanoic acid (PubChem CID: 8892); Hexyl acetate (PubChem CID:8908); Methanol (PubChem CID:137654); Methyl acetate (PubChem CID: 6584); Nerolidol (PubChem CID: 5284507); Nonanal (PubChem CID: 31289); Octanoic acid (PubChem CID: 379); Phenylethyl phenylacetate (PubChem CID: 7601); Propan-1-ol (PubChem CID:1031); Second fermentation; Sparkling wine; Tetradecanoic acid (PubChem CID:11005); Volatilome; γ-Decalactone (PubChem CID:12813)

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center