Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Artif Organs. 2019 Oct 24:391398819882439. doi: 10.1177/0391398819882439. [Epub ahead of print]

A surgical girdle postoperatively may prevent pain and tunnel infections of peritoneal dialysis patients.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umea University, Umeå, Sweden.
2
Medicinkliniken, Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeå, Sweden.

Abstract

AIM:

When performing acute onset dialysis after insertion of catheters for peritoneal dialysis, pain exists and tunnel infections may develop. This study investigated whether patients benefit from the use of a surgical girdle and specific dressing postoperatively to prevent pain and tunnel infections.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

In 85 consecutive patients, the development of tunnel infections was followed. The patients used a surgical girdle when they were in supine position from day 1 to day 3. The peritoneal dialysis catheter was fixed in a curvature avoiding stretch in the exit. A total of 53 patients participated in a retrospective questionnaire to evaluate abdominal pain within the first 3 days after surgery either with or without girdle. A visual analogue scale from 0 to 10 was used.

RESULTS:

In 23 patients, data on pain both with and without the girdle could be recorded. Pain was relieved more when using the girdle versus no girdle (median day 1 3.0 vs 4.0, p < 0.001, n = 30, Wilcoxon paired). The development of tunnel infections during the latest 7-year period (exposure period 1487 months) showed a total of three episodes (one every 495 months) of which one caused a subsequent peritonitis, while the other two resolved after antibiotic therapy. Peritonitis episodes appeared at a mean of 37-month interval.

CONCLUSION:

The use a surgical girdle for 3 days postoperatively and a fixation of the peritoneal dialysis catheter in a curved loop relieves the pain and results in few tunnel infections and subsequent episodes of peritonitis.

KEYWORDS:

Peritoneal dialysis; insertion technique; leakage; wound healing

PMID:
31648577
DOI:
10.1177/0391398819882439

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center