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Nat Commun. 2019 Oct 22;10(1):4802. doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-12785-3.

A mutualistic interaction between Streptomyces bacteria, strawberry plants and pollinating bees.

Author information

1
Department of Plant Medicine and Institute of Agriculture and Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, 52828, Republic of Korea.
2
Division of Applied Life Science and Research Institute of Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, 52828, Republic of Korea.
3
US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Wheat Health, Genetics, and Quality Research Unit, Pullman, WA, 99164-6430, USA.
4
Department of Plant Medicine and Institute of Agriculture and Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, 52828, Republic of Korea. kwak@gnu.ac.kr.
5
Division of Applied Life Science and Research Institute of Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, 52828, Republic of Korea. kwak@gnu.ac.kr.

Abstract

Microbes can establish mutualistic interactions with plants and insects. Here we track the movement of an endophytic strain of Streptomyces bacteria throughout a managed strawberry ecosystem. We show that a Streptomyces isolate found in the rhizosphere and on flowers protects both the plant and pollinating honeybees from pathogens (phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea and pathogenic bacteria, respectively). The pollinators can transfer the Streptomyces bacteria among flowers and plants, and Streptomyces can move into the plant vascular bundle from the flowers and from the rhizosphere. Our results present a tripartite mutualism between Streptomyces, plant and pollinator partners.

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