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Int J Ment Health Syst. 2019 Oct 14;13:64. doi: 10.1186/s13033-019-0320-9. eCollection 2019.

The experiences of lay health workers trained in task-shifting psychological interventions: a qualitative systematic review.

Author information

1
1Division of Population Health, Health Services Research & Primary Care, School of Health Sciences, The University of Manchester, Williamson Building, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL UK.
2
2Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
3
3School of Medicine, The University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.

Abstract

Introduction:

The prevalence of common mental disorders, such as depression and anxiety, is high and the demand for psychological interventions and talking therapies is increasing. In order to meet this need, it is necessary to explore alternative methods to deliver talking therapies. Training lay health workers (LHWs) to deliver psychological interventions might be one possible solution to address current gaps in service provision. A number of studies have successfully used this approach to deliver psychological interventions in order to meet the demand for mental health care. Despite increased interest in this area, the evidence has not been synthesised or systematically reviewed.

Methods:

Electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBBASE, PsycINFO and CINHAL) were systematically searched to specifically capture studies on task-shifting psychological interventions for common mental disorders. Data were extracted on the experiences of the lay-workers on training and therapy delivery. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Themes and subthemes of LHWs views on receiving training, barriers and facilitators to therapy delivery, factors required to become a successful therapist and the impact of training and therapy delivery on the therapists are described.

Results:

10 studies were eligible for inclusion. Key messages were: LHWs were satisfied with training but wanted more robust supervision; not enough time was given to training on understanding mental health problems; LHWs grew in confidence and this impacted on their personal relationships with others.

Conclusion:

This is the first review to explore LHWs experiences in training and therapy delivery by synthesising existing qualitative research. A number of key messages derived out of this review can help in further improving the quality of the training programmes and highlighting the benefits that are available for the LHW in delivering psychological interventions.

KEYWORDS:

Experiences; Lay health worker; Psychological intervention; Qualitative review; Task-shifting; Training

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interestsThe authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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