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J Clin Med. 2019 Oct 18;8(10). pii: E1725. doi: 10.3390/jcm8101725.

Long-Term Burden of Increased Body Mass Index from Childhood on Adult Dyslipidemia: The i3C Consortium Study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health & Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. ykyan2011@163.com.
2
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health & Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. lbazzano@tulane.edu.
3
Department of Medicine, University of Turku, Turku 20500, Finland. mataju@utu.fi.
4
Division of Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku 20521, Finland. mataju@utu.fi.
5
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia. mataju@utu.fi.
6
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku FI-20520, Finland. olli.raitakari@utu.fi.
7
Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku 20521, Finland. olli.raitakari@utu.fi.
8
Department of Medicine, University of Turku, Turku 20500, Finland. jorvii@utu.fi.
9
Division of Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku 20521, Finland. jorvii@utu.fi.
10
Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27101, USA. rprineas@wakehealth.edu.
11
George Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2BQ, UK. terence.dwyer@georgeinstitute.ox.ac.uk.
12
Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. sinai001@umn.edu.
13
Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52246, USA. trudy-burns@uiowa.edu.
14
Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Stephen.Daniels@childrenscolorado.org.
15
Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA. Jessica.Woo@cchmc.org.
16
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA. Jessica.Woo@cchmc.org.
17
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA. Phil.khoury@cchmc.org.
18
The Heart Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA. Phil.khoury@cchmc.org.
19
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA. Elaine.Urbina@cchmc.org.
20
The Heart Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA. Elaine.Urbina@cchmc.org.
21
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. Jacob004@umn.edu.
22
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. huxxx405@umn.edu.
23
Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Medical School, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. Stein055@umn.edu.
24
Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart TAS 7000, Australia. Alison.Venn@utas.edu.au.
25
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health & Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. wchen1@tulane.edu.

Abstract

Background: Data are limited regarding the association of cumulative burden and trajectory of body mass index (BMI) from early life with adult lipid disorders. Methods: The study cohort consisted of 5195 adults who had BMI repeatedly measured 4 to 21 times from childhood and had blood lipid measurements of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TG) and information on lipid-lowering medications in the last adult survey. The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated as a measure of long-term burden (total AUC) and trends (incremental AUC) of BMI. Results: Participants with dyslipidemia, high LDL-C, low HDL-C and high TG had consistently and significantly higher BMI levels from childhood to adulthood compared to those with normal lipid levels. After adjusting for age, race, sex, and cohort, increased risk of adult dyslipidemia was significantly associated with higher values of childhood BMI, adulthood BMI, total AUC and incremental AUC, with odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 1.22 (1.15-1.29), 1.85 (1.74-1.97), 1.61 (1.52-1.71), and 1.59 (1.50-1.69), respectively, and p < 0.001 for all. The association patterns were similar in most race-sex subgroups. Conclusions: Adults with dyslipidemia versus normal lipid levels have consistently higher levels and distinct life-course trajectories of BMI, suggesting that the impact of excessive body weight on dyslipidemia originates in early life.

KEYWORDS:

body mass index; childhood; dyslipidemia; longitudinal study

PMID:
31635325
DOI:
10.3390/jcm8101725
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