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J Pediatr Urol. 2019 Oct;15(5):495-502. doi: 10.1016/j.jpurol.2019.08.016. Epub 2019 Sep 26.

Quality improvement in pediatric urology-a historical perspective on street pumps, puerperal fever, surgical infection, and contemporary methodology.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Urology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.
2
Division of Pediatric Urology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada; Division of Pediatric Urology, UH Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, OH, USA.
3
Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
4
Division of Orthopedic Surgery, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
5
Division of Pediatric Urology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada; Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. Electronic address: martin.koyle@sickkids.ca.

Abstract

Quality improvement and patient safety (QIPS) can trace its origin back to the court of Hammurabi (circa 1700BC). However, it did not begin its evolution into its present methodology until the mid-19th century. It was through the application of quantitative parameters around the time of World War I that the field of QIPS has matured and gained a significant presence in the practice of medicine. Herein, the authors present a historical overview of this increasingly important field and correlate the current pediatric urology literature that has arisen from it. Because QIPS research is likely to contribute to efficient, streamlined health care through rapid changes to routine clinical practices, it would behoove pediatric urologists to familiarize themselves with its history and fundamental concepts.

KEYWORDS:

History; NSQIP; Patient safety; Pediatric urology; Quality improvement; SQUIRE

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