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Addict Behav. 2020 Jan;100:106129. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106129. Epub 2019 Sep 11.

Serious quit attempts and cessation implications for Asian American male smokers.

Author information

1
University of California, San Francisco, Department of Psychiatry, San Francisco, CA, United States of America; University of California, San Francisco, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA, United States of America.
2
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Department of Health Promotion and Policy, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, Amherst, MA, United States of America.
3
University of California, San Francisco, Division of Prevention Science, Department of Medicine, San Francisco, CA, United States of America.
4
University of California, San Francisco, Division of General Internal Medicine, San Francisco, CA, United States of America; Asian American Research Center on Health, San Francisco, CA, United States of America.
5
Asian American Research Center on Health, San Francisco, CA, United States of America; University of California, Merced, Department of Public Health, Merced, CA, United States of America; University of California, San Francisco, Department of Anthropology, History, and Social Medicine, San Francisco, CA, United States of America.
6
Asian American Research Center on Health, San Francisco, CA, United States of America; Chinese Community Health Resource Center, San Francisco, CA, United States of America.
7
University of California, San Francisco, Department of Psychiatry, San Francisco, CA, United States of America; Asian American Research Center on Health, San Francisco, CA, United States of America. Electronic address: Janice.Tsoh@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Smoking prevalence remains high among Asian American immigrant men, particularly those with limited English proficiency. Understanding ways to promote serious quit attempts (defined as a quit attempt lasting at least 24 h) could be crucial for reducing tobacco-related health disparities in this population. This study examines correlates of serious past year quit attempts among Chinese and Vietnamese American male daily smokers.

METHODS:

Baseline survey data were collected between 2015 and 2017 from a lifestyle intervention trial (N = 340 Chinese and Vietnamese male daily smokers). Data analysis was conducted in 2019. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with serious past year quit attempts.

RESULTS:

Less than half (43.2%) of the study participants had at least one serious past year quit attempt. Significant correlates of serious quit attempts included utilizing evidence-based methods (OR = 12.83, 95% CI 5.17-31.84) or other methods (OR = 3.92, 95% CI 3.92-13.73) to facilitate quitting compared to those who did not attempt to quit. Also, participants who had a physician encounter in the past year were more likely to have had a serious quit attempt (OR = 2.25, 95% CI 1.12-4.53). Discussing smoking during a past year doctor's visit, however, was not a significant correlate of serious quit attempts.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings underscore the importance of promoting the use of smoking cessation resources, and potentially utilizing healthcare encounters to facilitate cessation. Investigations are warranted to understand better how patient-physician interactions can enhance smoking cessation.

KEYWORDS:

Asian American; Health disparities; Smoking cessation; Tobacco use

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