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Int J Infect Dis. 2019 Oct 14. pii: S1201-9712(19)30397-2. doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2019.10.005. [Epub ahead of print]

Impact of vaccines on antimicrobial resistance.

Author information

1
GSK, 23 Rochester Park, Singapore, 139234, Singapore. Electronic address: philippe.x.buchy@gsk.com.
2
GSK, 23 Rochester Park, Singapore, 139234, Singapore. Electronic address: sibel.x.ascioglu@gsk.com.
3
Académie Nationale de Médecine, 16 rue Bonaparte, 75006, Paris, France. Electronic address: yvesbuisson@hotmail.com.
4
GSK, 23 Rochester Park, Singapore, 139234, Singapore. Electronic address: sanjoy.k.datta@gsk.com.
5
GSK, 23 Rochester Park, Singapore, 139234, Singapore. Electronic address: michael.d.nissen@gsk.com.
6
National University Health System, 1E Kent Ridge Road, Singapore, 119228, Singapore. Electronic address: mdcpat@nus.edu.sg.
7
World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia (WHO SEARO), Metropolitan Hotel, Bangla Sahib Road, Connaught Place, New Delhi, 110001, India. Electronic address: vongs@who.int.

Abstract

DRIVERS OF AMR:

Antibiotic use drives development and spread of resistant bacterial infections. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has become a prolific global issue due to significant increases in antibiotic use in humans, livestock and agriculture, inappropriate use (under-dosing and over prescribing) and misuse of antibiotics (for viral infections where they are ineffective). Fewer new antibiotics are being developed.

THE PROBLEM OF AMR:

AMR is now considered a key threat to global health, leading to more mortality and increased healthcare costs threatening future conduct of routine medical procedures. Traditional approaches to address AMR include antibiotic stewardship, better hygiene/infection control, promoting antibiotic research and development, and restricting use for agricultural purposes.

VACCINES AS A TOOL TO REDUCE AMR:

While antibiotic development is declining, vaccine technology is growing. This review shows how vaccines can decrease AMR, by preventing bacterial and viral infections thereby reducing use/misuse of antibiotics, and by preventing antibiotic-resistant infections. Vaccines are less likely to induce resistance. Some future uses and developments of vaccines are also discussed.

CONCLUSION:

Vaccines, along with other approaches, can help reduce AMR by preventing (resistant) infections and reducing antibiotic use. Industry and governments must focus on development of novel vaccines and drugs against resistant infections to successfully reduce AMR.

KEYWORDS:

Antimicrobial resistance; antibiotic; vaccine

PMID:
31622674
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijid.2019.10.005
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