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Niger Postgrad Med J. 2019 Oct-Dec;26(4):211-215. doi: 10.4103/npmj.npmj_36_19.

Drug treatment presentations at a treatment centre in southern Nigeria (2015-2018): Findings and implications for policy and practice.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Services, Drug Abuse Treatment Education and Research Unit, Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Benin-City, Edo State, Nigeria.
2
Department of Clinical Services, Clinical Psychology Unit, Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Benin-City, Edo State, Nigeria.
3
Department of Clinical Services, Biostatistics Unit, Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Benin-City, Edo State, Nigeria.
4
Department of Nursing Services, Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Benin-City, Edo State, Nigeria.

Abstract

Introduction:

Recent evidence suggests that rates of drug use and abuse in Nigeria exceed the global average. There is a strong treatment demand for psychoactive drug use disorders in Nigeria; however, it is not known whether available treatment facilities are attending to the array of treatment needs. This audit compares the pattern of presentations at a tertiary facility with a community-based survey.

Methods:

A review of cases (n = 212) seen at a regional drug treatment facility over a 4-year period, using local data retrieved from the Nigerian Epidemiological Network of Drug Use (NENDU) and comparison with data from the recently published national drug use survey.

Results:

Nine out of ten clients seen were male (93.4%). About half (49.5%) of the clients used psychoactive substances for the first time between ages 10 and 19 years. Cannabis was the primary drug of use overall and also among males, while females were more likely to present with opiate abuse. Over half had a co-occurring physical or mental disorder, and a minority had received testing for hepatitis C in the past 12 months.

Conclusion:

Although patterns of drug abuse presentations were consistent with findings from a national community-based survey, there was an under-representation of females in treatment. Implications for policy development and practice are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Policy; Southern Nigeria; psychoactive substance treatment

PMID:
31621660
DOI:
10.4103/npmj.npmj_36_19
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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