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Contemp Clin Trials. 2019 Oct 13;87:105851. doi: 10.1016/j.cct.2019.105851. [Epub ahead of print]

Telephone interventions for co-morbid insomnia and osteoarthritis pain: The OsteoArthritis and Therapy for Sleep (OATS) randomized trial design.

Author information

1
Department of Child, Family, and Population Health Nursing, University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, WA, United States of America. Electronic address: smccurry@uw.edu.
2
Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, United States of America.
3
Department of Psychology, Université Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada.
4
Department of Child, Family, and Population Health Nursing, University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, WA, United States of America.
5
Department of Nursing, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA, United States of America.
6
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, United States of America.

Abstract

The OsteoArthritis and Therapy for Sleep (OATS) study is a population-based randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) with four innovative methodological aims. These are to: (1) Enroll representative participants across Washington state, including those from medically underserved communities; (2) Enroll persons with persistent insomnia and chronic osteoarthritis (OA) pain; (3) Test a scalable CBT-I intervention; and (4) Evaluate patient-reported outcomes (insomnia, pain severity, fatigue, depression) and cost-effectiveness over one year. This paper describes progress towards achieving these aims. The target population was persons age 60+ who had received OA care within the Kaiser Permanente Washington (KPW) health care system. We employed a two-phase screening via mail survey and telephone follow-up, with a 3-week interval between screens to exclude persons with spontaneous improvement in sleep or pain symptoms. Participants were randomized to a 6-session telephone-delivered CBT-I intervention or a 6-session telephone education only control condition (EOC). Blinded outcome assessments (completed online or on mailed paper forms) included primary and secondary sleep and pain outcome measures and quality of life measures. We obtained healthcare utilization from administrative claims data. Intent to treat analyses, including all participants randomized when they scheduled the first telephone session, will be conducted to compare CBT-I and EOC outcomes. The trial will be the largest experimental evaluation of telephone CBT-I to date, and the first to evaluate its cost-effectiveness. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02946957.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic pain; Cognitive-behavioral intervention; Efficacy; Insomnia; Randomized controlled trial; Telephone intervention

PMID:
31614214
DOI:
10.1016/j.cct.2019.105851

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