Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMC Genomics. 2019 Oct 11;20(1):727. doi: 10.1186/s12864-019-6108-0.

Heart disease in a mutant mouse model of spontaneous eosinophilic myocarditis maps to three loci.

Author information

1
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
2
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
3
Division of Human Genetics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Bldg. R. MLC 7016, Cincinnati, OH, 45229-3039, USA.
4
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA. daniel.prows@cchmc.org.
5
Division of Human Genetics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Bldg. R. MLC 7016, Cincinnati, OH, 45229-3039, USA. daniel.prows@cchmc.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Heart disease (HD) is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hypereosinophilic diseases. Due to a lack of adequate animal models, our understanding of the pathophysiology of eosinophil-mediated diseases with heart complications is limited. We have discovered a mouse mutant, now maintained on an A/J inbred background, that spontaneously develops hypereosinophilia in multiple organs. Cellular infiltration into the heart causes an eosinophilic myocarditis, with affected mice of the mutant line (i.e., A/JHD) demonstrating extensive myocardial damage and remodeling that leads to HD and premature death, usually by 15-weeks old.

RESULTS:

Maintaining the A/JHD line for many generations established that the HD trait was heritable and implied the mode of inheritance was not too complex. Backcross and intercross populations generated from mating A/JHD males with females from four different inbred strains produced recombinant populations with highly variable rates of affected offspring, ranging from none in C57BL/6 J intercrosses, to a few mice with HD using 129S1/SvImJ intercrosses and C57BL/6 J backcrosses, but nearly 8% of intercrosses and > 17% of backcrosses from SJL/J related populations developed HD. Linkage analyses of these SJL/J derived recombinants identified three highly significant loci: a recessive locus mapping to distal chromosome 5 (LOD = 4.88; named Emhd1 for eosinophilic myocarditis to heart disease-1); and two dominant variants mapping to chromosome 17, one (Emhd2; LOD = 7.51) proximal to the major histocompatibility complex, and a second (Emhd3; LOD = 6.89) that includes the major histocompatibility region. Haplotype analysis identified the specific crossovers that defined the Emhd1 (2.65 Mb), Emhd2 (8.46 Mb) and Emhd3 (14.59 Mb) intervals.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results indicate the HD trait in this mutant mouse model of eosinophilic myocarditis is oligogenic with variable penetrance, due to multiple segregating variants and possibly additional genetic or nongenetic factors. The A/JHD mouse model represents a unique and valuable resource to understand the interplay of causal factors that underlie the pathology of this newly discovered eosinophil-associated disease with cardiac complications.

KEYWORDS:

Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Dilated cardiomyopathy; Disease model; Eosinophil-associated disease; Heart failure; Hypereosinophilia; Linkage mapping; Oligogenic trait; QTL; Spontaneous mouse mutant

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center