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Neuroimage. 2020 Jan 15;205:116240. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116240. Epub 2019 Oct 7.

The structure of the serotonin system: A PET imaging study.

Author information

1
Neurobiology Research Unit, Copenhagen, Denmark.
2
Neurobiology Research Unit, Copenhagen, Denmark; Section of Biostatistics, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
3
Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest, and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
4
Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Neurobiology Research Unit, Copenhagen, Denmark; Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
6
Neurobiology Research Unit, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Computer Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: mganz@nru.dk.

Abstract

The human brain atlas of the serotonin (5-HT) system does not conform with commonly used parcellations of neocortex, since the spatial distribution of homogeneous 5-HT receptors and transporter is not aligned with such brain regions. This discrepancy indicates that a neocortical parcellation specific to the 5-HT system is needed. We first outline issues with an existing parcellation of the 5-HT system, and present an alternative parcellation derived from brain MR- and high-resolution PET images of five different 5-HT targets from 210 healthy controls. We then explore how well this new 5-HT parcellation can explain mRNA levels of all 5-HT genes. The parcellation derived here represents a characterization of the 5-HT system which is more stable and explains the underlying 5-HT molecular imaging data better than other atlases, and may hence be more sensitive to capture region-specific changes modulated by 5-HT.

KEYWORDS:

Clustering; MRI; PET; Serotonin; Structure; mRNA

PMID:
31600591
PMCID:
PMC6951807
[Available on 2021-01-15]
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116240
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