Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pediatrics. 2019 Nov;144(5). pii: e20190817. doi: 10.1542/peds.2019-0817. Epub 2019 Oct 9.

Seeking a Second Opinion on Social Media.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, and brownamy@upstate.edu.
2
Center for Bioethics and Humanities, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York.
3
Department of Pediatrics and Albert Gnaegi Center for Health Care Ethics, Saint Louis University, St Louis, Missouri.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Northwest Permanente, Portland, Oregon; and.
5
Bioethics Center, Children's Mercy Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri.

Abstract

Social media pervades all aspects of our lives. In medicine, it has changed the ways that patients and parents get health information, advocate for particular treatments for themselves and their children, and raise money for expensive treatments. In this Ethics Rounds, we present a case in which the use of social media seemed to cross the boundaries of acceptable professionalism. What should the ground rules be for doctors who are tempted to give medical opinions online about patients whom they have never seen?

PMID:
31597691
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2019-0817

Conflict of interest statement

POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors have indicated they have no potential conflicts of interest to disclose.

Publication type

Publication type

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center