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Elife. 2019 Oct 9;8. pii: e47021. doi: 10.7554/eLife.47021.

Modular organization of cerebellar climbing fiber inputs during goal-directed behavior.

Author information

1
Department of Neurophysiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
2
CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama, Japan.
3
Department of Neurophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi, Japan.
4
Brain Science Institute, Tamagawa University, Tokyo, Japan.
5
Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.
6
Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
7
Department of Cellular Neurobiology, Brain Research Institute, Niigata University, Niigata, Japan.
8
International Research Center for Neurointelligence (WPI-IRCN), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study (UTIAS), The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

The cerebellum has a parasagittal modular architecture characterized by precisely organized climbing fiber (CF) projections that are congruent with alternating aldolase C/zebrin II expression. However, the behavioral relevance of CF inputs into individual modules remains poorly understood. Here, we used two-photon calcium imaging in the cerebellar hemisphere Crus II in mice performing an auditory go/no-go task to investigate the functional differences in CF inputs to modules. CF signals in medial modules show anticipatory decreases, early increases, secondary increases, and reward-related increases or decreases, which represent quick motor initiation, go cues, fast motor behavior, and positive reward outcomes. CF signals in lateral modules show early increases and reward-related decreases, which represent no-go and/or go cues and positive reward outcomes. The boundaries of CF functions broadly correspond to those of aldolase C patterning. These results indicate that spatially segregated CF inputs in different modules play distinct roles in the execution of goal-directed behavior.

KEYWORDS:

cerebellum; climbing fiber; go/no-go task; mouse; neuroscience

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