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J Clin Sleep Med. 2019 Oct 15;15(10):1433-1442. doi: 10.5664/jcsm.7970.

Rates of Mental Health Symptoms and Associations With Self-Reported Sleep Quality and Sleep Hygiene in Adolescents Presenting for Insomnia Treatment.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California.
2
Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio.
4
Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

Despite high prevalence rates of both psychopathology and sleep problems during adolescence, as well as frequent co-occurrence, little is known about the mental health of adolescents presenting for insomnia evaluation and treatment. This study describes (1) rates of mental health symptoms and (2) associations of mental health symptoms with sleep behaviors and schedules in adolescents presenting to a behavioral sleep medicine clinic within an accredited sleep disorders center.

METHODS:

As a part of routine clinical care, 376 adolescents (ages 11 to 18 years) presenting for insomnia evaluation completed measures of insomnia and sleep behavior. Their caregiver reported on mental health diagnoses and symptoms.

RESULTS:

Adolescents had high rates of mental health diagnoses (75%) and clinically elevated symptoms (64%). Affective, anxiety, and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms were most commonly reported. Mental health symptoms were related to sleep behaviors and insomnia severity, with ADHD symptoms and affective problems most consistently associated with disrupted sleep.

CONCLUSIONS:

Health providers should assess for mental health problems in youth presenting with sleep-related concerns. Intervening with both sleep and mental health problems should be considered to most effectively improve functioning.

KEYWORDS:

ADHD; adolescence; anxiety; comorbidity; depression; insomnia; psychopathology; sleep disorders; sleep hygiene

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