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J Huntingtons Dis. 2019 Sep 26. doi: 10.3233/JHD-190380. [Epub ahead of print]

Quality of Care for Huntington's Disease in the United States: Findings from a National Survey of Patients and Caregivers.

Author information

1
Georgetown University, Department of Psychiatry & Department of Neurology, Washington DC, USA.
2
Griffin Foundation, Naples, FL, USA.
3
Strategic Interests, LLC, Rochester, NY, USA.
4
Guidehouse LLP, Washington, DC, USA.
5
Huntington Study Group, Rochester, NY, USA.
6
Huntington's Disease Society of America, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Little is known about the quality of care for people living with Huntington's disease (HD) in the United States.

OBJECTIVE:

To document the current HD care experience and identify gaps in care provision in the United States.

METHODS:

Web-based surveys for persons self-identifying as being affected by HD (PAHD, which included individuals with, or at risk for HD) or as caregivers/family members were developed and refined with targeted input from focus groups comprised of caregivers and family members. The surveys were disseminated via social media and patient advocacy partners from April-May 2017.

RESULTS:

Total valid responses numbered 797, including 585 caregiver/family respondents and 212 PAHD responses. Respondents reported care provision from HD specialty centers, primary care, movement disorder clinics, and other settings. One in five respondents reported that the person with HD was not currently receiving medical or community care. Respondents generally reported a good level of care, with HD specialists providing the highest rated healthcare experience. Caregiver/family respondents reported helping with a range of activities including budget/finances (60.5%), housekeeping (57.1%) and daily help (53.2%). Most respondents (97.9%) reported searching online, including general information about HD (86.4%), using HD social media channels (61.3%) and looking up clinical trials (59.8%). Respondents emphasized a need for support in financial planning and accessing care, and also for more HD education in the medical community.

CONCLUSIONS:

There is need for more support for HD patients and families. People desire more credible, accessible information. Improving resources available to patients and families should be a goal for HD organizations, along with measurement of patient outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Huntington’s disease; caregiver; specialty care; survey

PMID:
31594241
DOI:
10.3233/JHD-190380

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