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Cureus. 2019 Aug 3;11(8):e5314. doi: 10.7759/cureus.5314.

Resident Physician Wellness Curriculum: A Study of Efficacy and Satisfaction.

Author information

1
Emergency Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, CAN.
2
Emergency Medicine, Addiction Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, CAN.
3
Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, CAN.
4
Emergency Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, CAN.
5
Emergency Medicine, Kingston Health Sciences Centre / Queen's University, Kingston, CAN.
6
Emergency Medicine, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, CAN.
7
Emergency Medicine, School of Community Based Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, CAN.

Abstract

Background Recent literature highlights the alarming prevalence of burnout, depression, and illness during residency training; a trend that is also linked to suboptimal patient care. Dedicated wellness curricula may be one solution to this concerning issue. Purpose To determine the effect of a multi-faceted wellness curriculum during emergency medicine residency training on wellness scores and to assess resident satisfaction with the program. Methods This study was conducted via a longitudinal survey. In 2009, a faculty-derived resident wellness curriculum (F-RWC) was initiated. This program was then bolstered with a parallel resident-derived curriculum (R-RWC) one year later, in 2010. Emergency medicine residents were surveyed in 2009, 2010, and 2011 to assess wellness at baseline, after one year of the F-RWC, and after one year of combined RWCs, respectively. Surveys included two validated assessment instruments (the Brief Resident Wellness Profile (BRWP) and the SF-8TM Health Survey), a satisfaction Likert scale, and a demographics information sheet. Results The survey response rates were 89% (n=17), 100% (n=17), and 83% (n=24) from 2009, 2010, and 2011, respectively, for a total of 58 participants. From baseline in 2009, there was a significant improvement in resident wellness, with the addition of parallel RWC by 2011, as measured by the BRWP (p=0.024). The faces scale, a subset of the BRWP, showed a trend toward benefit but did not reach statistical significance (p=0.085). There was no evidence of a statistically significant change in SF-8TM scores over time. Participants consistently reported positive satisfaction scores with RWC initiatives. Conclusions Dedicated RWC, with input from both faculty and resident physicians, improved wellness during residency training with a high degree of participant satisfaction. Such programs are needed to support resident physicians during their training.

KEYWORDS:

physician burnout; physician well-being; resident curriculum; resident training; resident wellness; wellness

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

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