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Pediatr Diabetes. 2019 Oct 7. doi: 10.1111/pedi.12927. [Epub ahead of print]

Temporal Trends in Incidence of Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes in Alabama: 2000-2017.

Author information

1
Science and Technology Honors, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
2
Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Alabama.
3
Department of Epidemiology, UAB School of Public Health, Birmingham, Alabama.
4
Georgia Campus- Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Suwanee, Georgia.
5
University of Alabama School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Ave South, Birmingham, Alabama.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The incidence of type 1 diabetes has increased in the US and worldwide. We hypothesized that trends in the annual incidence rates of childhood-onset type 1 diabetes in the state of Alabama would be different by race and sex.

METHODS:

We performed a retrospective observational cohort study, analyzing children with type 1 diabetes (n = 3770) managed at the Children's Hospital of Alabama between 2000-2017. We compared crude incidence rates using negative binomial regression models and analyzed differences in annual trends of age-adjusted incidence by race and sex using joinpoint regression.

RESULTS:

The crude type 1 diabetes incidence rate was estimated at 16.7 per 100 000 children <19 years of age in Alabama. Between 2000 and 2007, there was an increase in age-adjusted incidence of type 1 diabetes with an annual percent change (APC) of 10% from 2000-2007 and a 1.7% APC decrease from 2007-2017. The age-adjusted incidence for Whites and Blacks increased with an average annual percentage change (AAPC) of 4.4% and 2.8%, respectively. A nearly 11% increasing trend in age-adjusted incidence was observed for both races, though the increase plateaued in 2006 for Whites and 2010 for Blacks.

CONCLUSIONS:

Following significantly increasing annual trends for both races, the age-adjusted rate remained statistically stable for Whites and decreased significantly for Blacks. Longer-sustained trend increases for Blacks resulted in type 1 diabetes incidence tripling compared to the doubling of the rate for Whites. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

diabetes in Youth; epidemiology; incidence; trends; type 1 diabetes

PMID:
31591761
DOI:
10.1111/pedi.12927

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