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Nat Hum Behav. 2019 Oct 7. doi: 10.1038/s41562-019-0738-8. [Epub ahead of print]

Identification of neurobehavioural symptom groups based on shared brain mechanisms.

Author information

1
Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, King's College London, London, UK.
2
Neuroimaging, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany.
3
Behaviour and Basal Ganglia Research Unit, University of Rennes, Rennes, France.
4
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, Njmegen, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
6
Discipline of Psychiatry, School of Medicine and Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
7
Systems Neuroscience, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
8
Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
9
Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience King's College London, London, UK.
10
Department of Psychiatry, CHU Ste Justine Hospital, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
11
Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
12
Department of Psychology, School of Social Sciences, University of Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany.
13
NeuroSpin, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, France.
14
Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA.
15
Sir Peter Mansfield Imaging Centre School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
16
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy CCM, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany.
17
Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig and Berlin, Germany.
18
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Charité, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
19
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, INSERM Unit 1000 Neuroimaging & Psychiatry, University Paris Saclay, University Paris Descartes; DIgiteo-Labs, Gif-sur-Yvette; and Maison de Solenn, Paris, France.
20
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany.
21
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, INSERM Unit 1000 Neuroimaging & Psychiatry, University Paris Saclay, University Paris Descartes; DIgiteo-Labs, Gif-sur-Yvette, France.
22
AP-HP.Sorbonne Université, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France.
23
Department of Social and Health Care, Psychosocial Services Adolescent Outpatient Clinic, Lahti, Finland.
24
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Centre Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
25
Department of Psychiatry and Neuroimaging Centre, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
26
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK.
27
Mood Brain and Development Unit, National Institute of Mental Health/NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
28
School of Psychology and Global Brain Health Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
29
Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
30
NORMENT, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
31
Department of Psychiatric Research, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
32
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
33
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, UMR 992 INSERM, CEA, Faculté de médecine, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, NeuroSpin, Gif-sur-Yvette, France.
34
Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK.
35
Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging, UCL Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, UK.
36
Department of Psychology and Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
37
Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, King's College London, London, UK. gunter.schumann@kcl.ac.uk.
38
PONS Research Group, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charite Mitte, Humboldt University, Berlin and Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Magdeburg, Germany. gunter.schumann@kcl.ac.uk.
39
PONS Research Group, Institute for Science and Technology of Brain-inspired Intelligence (ISTBI), Fudan University, Shanghai, China. gunter.schumann@kcl.ac.uk.
40
PONS Research Group, Dept. of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charite Mitte, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany. gunter.schumann@kcl.ac.uk.
41
PONS Research Group, Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Magdeburg, Germany. gunter.schumann@kcl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Most psychopathological disorders develop in adolescence. The biological basis for this development is poorly understood. To enhance diagnostic characterization and develop improved targeted interventions, it is critical to identify behavioural symptom groups that share neural substrates. We ran analyses to find relationships between behavioural symptoms and neuroimaging measures of brain structure and function in adolescence. We found two symptom groups, consisting of anxiety/depression and executive dysfunction symptoms, respectively, that correlated with distinct sets of brain regions and inter-regional connections, measured by structural and functional neuroimaging modalities. We found that the neural correlates of these symptom groups were present before behavioural symptoms had developed. These neural correlates showed case-control differences in corresponding psychiatric disorders, depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in independent clinical samples. By characterizing behavioural symptom groups based on shared neural mechanisms, our results provide a framework for developing a classification system for psychiatric illness that is based on quantitative neurobehavioural measures.

PMID:
31591521
DOI:
10.1038/s41562-019-0738-8

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