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Nutrients. 2019 Oct 6;11(10). pii: E2385. doi: 10.3390/nu11102385.

Fasting Glucose State Determines Metabolic Response to Supplementation with Insoluble Cereal Fibre: A Secondary Analysis of the Optimal Fibre Trial (OptiFiT).

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Nutrition, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany. Stefan.kabisch@dife.de.
2
Deutsches Zentrum für Diabetesforschung e.V., Geschäftsstelle am Helmholtz-Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany. Stefan.kabisch@dife.de.
3
Department of Clinical Nutrition, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany. nina.meyer@dife.de.
4
Deutsches Zentrum für Diabetesforschung e.V., Geschäftsstelle am Helmholtz-Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany. nina.meyer@dife.de.
5
Department of Clinical Nutrition, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany. caroline.honsek@gmail.com.
6
Department of Clinical Nutrition, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany. Christiana.Gerbracht@dife.de.
7
Department of Clinical Nutrition, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany. ulrikedambeck@gmx.de.
8
Department of Clinical Nutrition, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany. margrit.kemper@dife.de.
9
Deutsches Zentrum für Diabetesforschung e.V., Geschäftsstelle am Helmholtz-Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany. margrit.kemper@dife.de.
10
Department of Clinical Nutrition, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany. martin@cm-osterhoff.de.
11
Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité University Medicine, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin, Germany. martin@cm-osterhoff.de.
12
Deutsches Zentrum für Diabetesforschung e.V., Geschäftsstelle am Helmholtz-Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany. Andreas.Birkenfeld@uniklinikum-dresden.de.
13
Section of Metabolic Vascular Medicine, Medical Clinic III and Paul Langerhans Institute Dresden of the Helmholtz Center Munich at University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, TU Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany. Andreas.Birkenfeld@uniklinikum-dresden.de.
14
Section of Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, Rayne Institute, Denmark Hill Campus, King's College London, SE5 9NT London, UK. Andreas.Birkenfeld@uniklinikum-dresden.de.
15
Department of Clinical Nutrition, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany. Ayman.Arafat@charite.de.
16
Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité University Medicine, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin, Germany. Ayman.Arafat@charite.de.
17
University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Science, Department of Nutrition, Exercise, and Sports, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark. madsfiil@nexs.ku.dk.
18
Warwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism; The ARDEN NET Centre, ENETS CoE; University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, CV2 2DX Coventry, UK. M.weickert@outlook.com.
19
Centre of Applied Biological & Exercise Sciences (ABES), Faculty of Health & Life Sciences, Coventry University, CV1 5FB Coventry, UK. M.weickert@outlook.com.
20
Translational & Experimental Medicine, Division of Biomedical Sciences, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, CV4 7AL Coventry, UK. M.weickert@outlook.com.
21
Department of Clinical Nutrition, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany. afhp@dife.de.
22
Deutsches Zentrum für Diabetesforschung e.V., Geschäftsstelle am Helmholtz-Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany. afhp@dife.de.
23
Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité University Medicine, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin, Germany. afhp@dife.de.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

High intake of cereal fibre is associated with reduced risk for type 2 diabetes and long-term complications. Within the first long-term randomized controlled trial specifically targeting cereal fibre, the Optimal Fibre Trial (OptiFiT), intake of insoluble oat fibre was shown to significantly reduce glycaemia. Previous studies suggested that this effect might be limited to subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG).

AIM:

We stratified the OptiFiT cohort for normal and impaired fasting glucose (NFG, IFG) and conducted a secondary analysis comparing the effects of fibre supplementation between these subgroups.

METHODS:

180 Caucasian participants with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) were randomized to twice-a-day fibre or placebo supplementation for 2 years (n = 89 and 91, respectively), while assuring double-blinded intervention. Fasting blood sampling, oral glucose tolerance test and full anthropometry were assessed annually. At baseline, out of 136 subjects completing the first year of intervention, 72 (54 %) showed IFG and IGT, while 64 subjects had IGT only (labelled "NFG"). Based on these two groups, we performed a stratified per-protocol analysis of glycometabolic and secondary effects during the first year of intervention.

RESULTS:

The NFG group did not show significant differences between fibre and placebo group concerning anthropometric, glycometabolic, or other biochemical parameters. Within the IFG stratum, 2-h glucose, HbA1c, and gamma-glutamyl transferase levels decreased more in the fibre group, with a significant supplement x IFG interaction effect for HbA1c. Compared to NFG subjects, IFG subjects had larger benefits from fibre supplementation with respect to fasting glucose levels. Results were robust against adjustment for weight change and sex. An ITT analysis did not reveal any differences from the per-protocol analysis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although stratification resulted in relatively small subgroups, we were able to pinpoint our previous findings from the entire cohort to the IFG subgroup. Cereal fibre can beneficially affect glycemic metabolism, with most pronounced or even isolated effectiveness in subjects with impaired fasting glucose.

KEYWORDS:

diabetes mellitus type 2; diabetes prevention; impaired fasting glucose; impaired glucose tolerance; insoluble dietary fibre; insulin sensitivity; prediabetes; stratification

PMID:
31590438
DOI:
10.3390/nu11102385
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Conflict of interest statement

S.K. and C.H. received a travel grant from Rettenmaier & Soehne, Holzmuehle, Germany, including conference fees and acccomodation. The authors declare no further conflicts of interest associated with this manuscript. The sponsors were neither involved in study design, data collection nor publication.

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