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Lab Chip. 2019 Nov 7;19(21):3726-3734. doi: 10.1039/c9lc00902g. Epub 2019 Oct 7.

Rapid and label-free isolation of small extracellular vesicles from biofluids utilizing a novel insulator based dielectrophoretic device.

Author information

1
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
2
Department of Environmental Health, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
3
Division of Endocrinology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
4
Department of Environmental Health, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA and Cincinnati Cancer Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
5
Division of Endocrinology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA and Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA and Department of Metabolic Bioregulation, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Japan.
6
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA and Cincinnati Cancer Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA and Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA. esfandla@ucmail.uc.edu.

Abstract

Exosomes are nano-scale membrane-encapsulated vesicles produced by the majority of cells and have emerged as a rich source of biomarkers for a wide variety of diseases. Although many approaches have been developed for exosome isolation from biofluids, most of them have substantial shortcomings including long processing time, inefficiency, high cost, lack of specificity and/or surface marker-dependency. To address these issues, here we report a novel insulator-based dielectrophoretic (iDEP) device predicated on an array of borosilicate micropipettes to rapidly isolate exosomes from conditioned cell culture media and biofluids, such as plasma, serum, and saliva. The device is capable of exosome isolation from small sample volumes of 200 μL within 20 minutes under a relatively low (10 V cm-1) direct current (DC). This device is easy to fabricate thus, no cleanroom facility and expensive equipment are needed. Therefore, the iDEP device offers a rapid and cost-effective strategy for exosome isolation from biofluids in timely manner while maintaining the yield and purity.

PMID:
31588942
DOI:
10.1039/c9lc00902g

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