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J Gay Lesbian Soc Serv. 2019;31(2):141-152. doi: 10.1080/10538720.2018.1548325. Epub 2019 May 6.

HIV/AIDS stigma manifestations during clinical interactions with MSM in Puerto Rico.

Author information

1
Florida International University, Department of Global and Sociocultural Studies, 11200 SW 8th Street, SIPA 316, Miami, Florida, USA 33199, 305-348-2618, nvarasdi@fiu.edu.
2
Ponce Health Sciences University, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Ponce, Puerto Rico, elrivera@psm.edu.
3
University of California at San Francisco, Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, San Francisco, USA, torsten.neilands@ucsf.edu.
4
Ponce Health Sciences University, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Ponce, Puerto Rico, Pcarminelli15@stu.psm.edu.
5
University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras, Department of Social Sciences, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Fabianpsicologia5922@gmail.com.
6
Florida International University, Department of Arts and Sciences, Miami, Florida, USA, evara002@fiu.edu.
7
University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, School of Medicine, San Juan, Puerto Rico, nerian.ortiz@upr.edu.
8
University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, School of Medicine, San Juan, Puerto Rico, yasmin.pedrogo@upr.edu.
9
University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras, School of Social Work, San Juan Puerto Rico, marinilda75@gmail.com.

Abstract

HIV/AIDS stigma can have detrimental effects on physician/patient interactions when manifested by health professionals. Unfortunately, HIV/AIDS stigma is usually manifested in an intersectional manner with other pre-existing stigmas, including stigma towards men who have sex with men (MSM). Therefore, our study aimed to examine the behavioral manifestations of HIV/AIDS stigma among physicians in training during simulated clinical interactions with MSM, and explore the interrelation between HIV/AIDS stigma attitudes and behaviors. We implemented an experimental design using Standardized Patient simulations with a sample of 100 physicians in training in Puerto Rico. Results show a significant difference in the two groups' means (p<.001), with a higher number of stigma behaviors in the HIV MSM patient condition (M=6.39) than the common cold control condition (M=5.20). Results evidence that stigma manifestations towards MSM with HIV may continue to be an obstacle for public health in Puerto Rico, and that medical training to prevent stigma is still needed.

KEYWORDS:

Behaviors; HIV/AIDS; MSM; Physicians; Stigma

PMID:
31588167
PMCID:
PMC6777726
[Available on 2020-05-06]
DOI:
10.1080/10538720.2018.1548325

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