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J Pediatr. 2019 Oct 3. pii: S0022-3476(19)31055-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2019.08.020. [Epub ahead of print]

Trends in Outcomes for Neonates Born Very Preterm and Very Low Birth Weight in 11 High-Income Countries.

Author information

1
Department of Newborn Care, Royal Hospital for Women and School of Women's and Children's Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Sinai Health System, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Maternal-Infant Care Research Centre, Sinai Health System, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Division of Neonatology, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Swiss Neonatal Network, Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
5
Spanish Neonatal Network, Health Research Institute La Fe, Avenida Fernando Abril Martorell, Valencia, Spain.
6
Israel Neonatal Network, Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
7
Department of Paediatrics, University of Otago, Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand.
8
Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
9
UK Neonatal Collaborative, Neonatal Data Analysis Unit, Section of Neonatal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital Campus, London, United Kingdom.
10
Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neonatal Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
11
Department of Clinical Science/Pediatrics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
12
Unit of Epidemiology Meyer Children's University Hospital and Regional Health Agency, Florence, Italy.
13
Pediatrics & Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
14
Maternal-Infant Care Research Centre, Sinai Health System, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
15
Department of Pediatrics, Sinai Health System, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Maternal-Infant Care Research Centre, Sinai Health System, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate outcome trends of neonates born very preterm in 11 high-income countries participating in the International Network for Evaluating Outcomes of neonates.

STUDY DESIGN:

In a retrospective cohort study, we included 154 233 neonates admitted to 529 neonatal units between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2015, at 240/7 to 316/7 weeks of gestational age and birth weight <1500 g. Composite outcomes were in-hospital mortality or any of severe neurologic injury, treated retinopathy of prematurity, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD); and same composite outcome excluding BPD. Secondary outcomes were mortality and individual morbidities. For each country, annual outcome trends and adjusted relative risks comparing epoch 2 (2012-2015) to epoch 1 (2007-2011) were analyzed.

RESULTS:

For composite outcome including BPD, the trend decreased in Canada and Israel but increased in Australia and New Zealand, Japan, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. For composite outcome excluding BPD, the trend decreased in all countries except Spain, Sweden, Tuscany, and the United Kingdom. The risk of composite outcome was lower in epoch 2 than epoch 1 in Canada (adjusted relative risks 0.78; 95% CI 0.74-0.82) only. The risk of composite outcome excluding BPD was significantly lower in epoch 2 compared with epoch 1 in Australia and New Zealand, Canada, Finland, Japan, and Switzerland. Mortality rates reduced in most countries in epoch 2. BPD rates increased significantly in all countries except Canada, Israel, Finland, and Tuscany.

CONCLUSIONS:

In most countries, mortality decreased whereas BPD increased for neonates born very preterm.

KEYWORDS:

bronchopulmonary dysplasia; low birthweight; neonatal outcomes; preterm infant; retrospective study

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