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Int Urol Nephrol. 2019 Oct 5. doi: 10.1007/s11255-019-02299-8. [Epub ahead of print]

Metabolism of fatty acids and bile acids in plasma is associated with overactive bladder in males: potential biomarkers and targets for novel treatments in a metabolomics analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, University of Yamanashi, 1110 Shimokato, Chuo-City, Yamanashi, 409-3898, Japan. tmitsui@yamanashi.ac.jp.
2
Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, University of Yamanashi, 1110 Shimokato, Chuo-City, Yamanashi, 409-3898, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The present study was conducted to identify metabolites using a metabolomics approach and investigate the relationship between these metabolites and urgency as a major symptom of overactive bladder (OAB).

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

In 47 male participants without any apparent neurological disease, OAB was defined as an urgency score on the International Prostate Symptom Score of 2 and higher (OAB group, nā€‰=ā€‰26), while patients with a score of 1 or 0 were placed in a control group (nā€‰=ā€‰21). A comprehensive study on plasma metabolites was conducted, and metabolites were compared between the OAB and control groups.

RESULTS:

Age was significantly higher in the OAB group, while prostate volume did not differ between the groups. A 24-h bladder diary revealed that nocturnal urine volume, 24-h micturition frequency, nocturnal micturition frequency, and the nocturnal index were significantly higher in the OAB group, whereas maximum voided volume was significantly lower in this group. The metabolomics analysis identified 79 metabolites from the plasma of participants. The multivariate analysis showed that increases in the fatty acids (22:1), erucic acid and palmitoleic acid, and a decrease in cholic acid correlated with incidence of male OAB. A decrease in acylcarnitine (18:2)-3 and an increase in cis-11-eicosenoic acid also appeared to be associated with OAB in males.

CONCLUSIONS:

OAB in males may occur through the abnormal metabolism of fatty acids and bile acids. Further studies on these pathways will contribute to the detection of new biomarkers and development of potential targets for novel treatments.

KEYWORDS:

Bile acids; Fatty acids; Metabolic syndrome; Metabolomics; Overactive bladder (OAB)

PMID:
31587188
DOI:
10.1007/s11255-019-02299-8

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