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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1985 Jun;60(6):1154-60.

Puberty in the chimpanzee: somatomedin-C and its relationship to somatic growth and steroid hormone concentrations.

Abstract

A relationship between sex steroids and the somatomedins (Sms) is well known, but poorly defined. In some primates, including man, there are pubertal increases in Sms, concurrent with increased growth and sex steroid production. In the current studies, indices of somatic growth [body weight, crown-rump length (CRL), and testis size (testicular volume index)] and circulating concentrations of testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), cortisol, and Sm-C were determined (n = 208) in 86 male and female chimpanzees during a 1-yr period. In addition, we have attempted to determine whether plasma Sm-C concentrations correlate with serum levels of estrogen and androgens. In male animals between 6 and 8 yr of age, there was a marked increase in testicular size, concurrent with an increase in serum T and preceding slightly an increase in the rate of body weight gain. There were no detectable increases in serum E2 or the CRL slope. In females between 6 and 8 yr of age, serum T increased, concurrent with an increase in the rate of body weight gain much smaller than that in male animals. Serum E2 increased only after 10 yr of age, and no increased linear growth (CRL) was found. In both sexes, increases in serum DHEA-S were found by 4-6 yr of age, in contrast to cortisol concentrations, which were high and remained unchanged from birth to 12 yr of age, except for lower values in the very youngest and very oldest female animals. An increase in Sm-C occurred in both sexes by 4-6 yr of age, with higher values in female than in male animals 0-2, 4-6, and 6-8 yr of age, and when all ages were considered together. In both sexes, plasma Sm-C concentrations correlated with serum T (r = 0.60 and P less than 0.001; r = 0.68 and P less than 0.001; females and males, respectively), although when both sexes were analyzed together, the correlation was not as good (r = 0.36; P less than 0.001). Sm-C concentrations correlated with serum DHEA-S when the two sexes were analyzed separately (r = 0.44 and P less than 0.001; r = 0.54 and P less than 0.001; females and males, respectively) or together (r = 0.49; P less than 0.001). Sm-C correlated poorly with serum E2 levels in females (r = 0.20; P less than 0.05) and did not correlate with E2 in males.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

PMID:
3158669
DOI:
10.1210/jcem-60-6-1154
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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