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Nat Commun. 2019 Oct 3;10(1):4490. doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-12429-6.

Zinc-doped Prussian blue enhances photothermal clearance of Staphylococcus aureus and promotes tissue repair in infected wounds.

Author information

1
School of Materials Science and Engineering, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology by the Ministry of Education of China, Tianjin University, 300072, Tianjin, China.
2
Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Hubei Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, 430062, Wuhan, China.
3
State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, 100871, Beijing, China.
4
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, 999077, China.
5
School of Materials Science and Engineering, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology by the Ministry of Education of China, Tianjin University, 300072, Tianjin, China. shuilinwu@tju.edu.cn.

Abstract

The application of photothermal therapy to treat bacterial infections remains a challenge, as the high temperatures required for bacterial elimination can damage healthy tissues. Here, we develop an exogenous antibacterial agent consisting of zinc-doped Prussian blue (ZnPB) that kills methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in vitro and in a rat model of cutaneous wound infection. Local heat triggered by the photothermal effect accelerates the release and penetration of ions into the bacteria, resulting in alteration of intracellular metabolic pathways and bacterial killing without systemic toxicity. ZnPB treatment leads to the upregulation of genes involved in tissue remodeling, promotes collagen deposition and enhances wound repair. The efficient photothermal conversion of ZnPB allows the use of relatively few doses and low laser flux, making the platform a potential alternative to current antibiotic therapies against bacterial wound infections.

PMID:
31582736
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-019-12429-6
Free PMC Article

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