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J Infect Dis. 2019 Oct 4. pii: jiz503. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiz503. [Epub ahead of print]

Longitudinal antibody responses in people who inject drugs infected with similar HIV strains.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Immunoregulation, Division of Intramural Research, NIAID, NIH, Bethesda MD, USA.
2
Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore MD, USA.
3
Vaccine Research Center, NIAID, NIH, Bethesda MD, USA.
4
Dartmouth College, Hanover NH, USA.
5
Biostatistics Research Branch, NIAID, NIH; Bethesda MD.
6
Genomics Unit, Research Technologies Branch, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Division of Intramural Research, NIAID, NIH, Hamilton MT, USA.
7
AIDS and Cancer Virus Program, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Fredrick MD, USA.
8
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA.
9
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.
10
Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Nashville, TN, USA.
11
BioInfoExperts Inc, Thibodaux LA, USA.
12
Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg of School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore MD, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Multiple factors influence the HIV antibody response produced during natural infection, leading to responses that can vary in specificity, strength, and breadth.

METHODS:

People who inject drugs identified as recently infected with HIV (n=23) were analyzed for clustering of their viral sequences (genetic distance <2%). Longitudinal antibody responses were identified for neutralizing antibody (Nab) potential, and differences in antibody subclass, specificity, and Fc receptor ligation using pseudovirus entry and multiplexed Fc array assays, respectively. Responses were analyzed for differences between subject groups defined by similarity in the sequence of the infecting virus.

RESULTS:

Viral sequences from infected individuals were grouped into three distinct clusters with seven unclustered individuals. Subjects in cluster one generally had lower antibody response magnitudes with the exception of antibodies targeting the V1/V2 region. Subjects in clusters two and three typically had higher antibody response magnitudes, with the Fv specificity of cluster two favoring gp140 recognition. NAb responses were significantly different between clusters for 3/18 pseudoviruses examined (p<0.05), but there were no differences in overall NAb breadth (p=0.62).

DISCUSSION:

These data demonstrate that individuals infected with similar viral strains can generate partially similar antibody responses, but these do not drastically differ from individuals infected with relatively unrelated strains.

PMID:
31581292
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiz503

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