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J Athl Train. 2019 Nov;54(11):1179-1186. doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-330-18. Epub 2019 Oct 3.

Epidemiology of Secondary School Boys' and Girls' Basketball Injuries: National Athletic Treatment, Injury and Outcomes Network.

Author information

1
Athletic Training Programs, Department of Interdisciplinary Heath Sciences, Still University, Mesa.
2
Datalys Center for Sports Injury Research and Prevention, Inc, Indianapolis, IN.
3
Research Support, Still University, Mesa.
4
Ohio University, Athens.
5
Lebanon Valley College, Annville, PA.
6
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
7
School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona, A.T. Still University, Mesa.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Little is known about non-time-loss (NTL) injury patterns in basketball athletes. Knowledge of these patterns may aid in the development of prevention and management strategies for patients with these injuries.

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the epidemiology of time-loss (TL) and NTL injuries sustained by secondary school boys' and girls' basketball athletes.

DESIGN:

Descriptive epidemiology study.

SETTING:

Eighty-six unique schools provided data, with 84 and 83 contributing to boys' and girls' basketball, respectively.

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:

Athletes participating in secondary school-sponsored boys' and girls' basketball.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Boys' and girls' basketball data from the National Athletic Treatment, Injury and Outcomes Network (NATION) injury-surveillance program (2011-2012 through 2013-2014 years) were analyzed. Injury counts, rates, and rate ratios (IRRs) were reported with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS:

The NATION captured 2653 injuries over 364 355 athlete-exposures (AEs) for boys' basketball and 2394 injuries over 288 286 AE for girls' basketball, producing rates of 7.28/1000 AEs (95% CI = 7.00, 7.56) for boys and 8.30/1000 AEs (95% CI = 7.97, 8.64) for girls. The overall injury rates were slightly lower for boys (IRR = 0.88; 95% CI = 0.83, 0.93). For boys, 559 (21.1%) injuries were TL and 2094 (78.9%) were NTL, producing a TL injury rate of 1.53/1000 AEs (95% CI = 1.40, 1.66) and an NTL injury rate of 5.75/1000 AEs (95% CI = 5.50, 5.99). For girls, 499 (20.8%) injuries were TL and 1895 (79.2%) were NTL, producing a TL injury rate of 1.73/1000 AEs (95% CI = 1.58, 1.88) and an NTL injury rate of 6.57/1000 AEs (95% CI = 6.28, 6.87). Rates of TL injuries were similar between boys' and girls' basketball (IRR = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.79, 1.00); NTL injury rates were lower for boys (IRR = 0.87; 95% CI = 0.82, 0.93).

CONCLUSIONS:

When NTL injuries were included, the rates of injury in boys' and girls' secondary school basketball were higher than previously reported.

KEYWORDS:

adolescents; injury incidence; youth sports

PMID:
31580704
PMCID:
PMC6863694
[Available on 2020-11-01]
DOI:
10.4085/1062-6050-330-18

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