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J Cardiovasc Thorac Res. 2019;11(3):237-243. doi: 10.15171/jcvtr.2019.39. Epub 2019 Aug 29.

The association of food quality score and cardiovascular diseases risk factors among women: A cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
2
Students' Scientific Research Center (SSRC), Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran, Iran.
3
Diabetes Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
4
Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
5
School of Nutrition, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
6
Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan, Iran.

Abstract

Introduction: Limited studies are available regarding the relationship between Food Quality Score (FQS) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Thus, this study was aimed to investigate the association of FQS with CVD risk factors in women. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out among 368 women aged 20-50 years who randomly selected from health centers across Tehran, Iran. Dietary intake was collected using a reliable and validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The FQS includes vegetables, fruits, whole grains, yogurt, nuts and legumes, coffee, refined grains, desserts and ice cream, sugar-sweetened beverages, red meats, fried food consumed outside the home, processed meats, potato and potato chips. Standard methods were used to assess blood pressure, biochemical and anthropometric measures. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the association between FQS and CVD risk factors. Results: Participant mean age and body mass index (BMI) were 30.7 ± 6.9 years and 24.3 ± 4.0 kg/m2, respectively. After taking potential confounders into account, FQS had no significant association with risk of overweight and obesity [Odds ratio (OR): 1.1, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.68, 1.8; P = 0.683], diabetes (OR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.22, 1.74; P = 0.374), metabolic syndrome (OR: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.10, 1.32; P = 0.127), hypercholesterolemia (OR: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.29, 1.01; P= 0.051), or hypertriglyceridemia (OR: 1.63, 95% CI: 0.71, 3.70; P = 0.244). Conclusion: The results showed that FQS was not significantly associated with CVD risk factors among women. Prospective cohort studies are warranted to confirm our findings.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular Risk Factors; Diabetes; Dyslipidemia; Food Quality Score; Obesity

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